To give you a simple example, when techi buys a very good phone, like the Nokia 8800, the “playing” process takes from a week to a month, somewhere in that range. Yes, the design of this device seems ideal to many, but it's not far from the truth. Yes, thanks to advertising, rumors and other events around 8800, the atmosphere of a luxurious little thing has been created, which needs the right environment. But the 8800 is not the kind of device that you can dig into for a long time or do all sorts of experiments with it, it’s a luxurious, but rather ordinary “dialer” that a techi representative can buy only by succumbing to advertising impulses.

And that's why the concept of using two phones, which Mads Winblad talked about, quite allows gadget addicts to own two devices at once. For example, one is used as a daily one, has a good player, the second is a smartphone with a powerful camera. Such kits have been advertised for quite a long time, suffice it to recall the combination of Nokia 6230i and Nokia 9500. Nobody bothers to make other “pairs”, for example, it can be the same Nokia 8800 SE and Nokia N91, a rich iron kit of a bored businessman. Or a schoolboy, because…

Because consumer lending, in fact, has killed all the charm of a one-time purchase of an expensive device. Let's say, when I bought a Nokia 9500 almost at the very beginning of sales, it was very disappointing to see a rather young man with the same communicator. I don’t think it was a gift from his parents, clothes, habits, some other details clearly indicated that he was not taken to school in a Bently. Rather, this techi thumped all his capital into the first installment for an expensive machine. There is no point in such a purchase, in my opinion - this is a typical manifestation of gadget addiction, the purchase of the desired thing for the sake of the purchase process itself, and not for the sake of subsequent at least some long and effective use.

By the way, young people are considered to be the most gadget-addicted, this is explained quite simply - they are most susceptible to advertising, the fact that someone can own an even “cooler” model, in the youth environment, the model and brand of the phone can say about the certain wealth of its owner. In general, the phone is a kind of pen in the head, by which others judge a person.

One more question: isn't there a purchase of a "vintage" model, which has recently become almost a fashionable act among people of a certain mindset, an attempt to atone for guilt before oneself for the fact that for a long, long time hard-earned money was spent on expensive toys that are changed every two months? As some used device sellers say, there is always a demand for some of the former elite models. These are such phones as Nokia 8850, Motorola V60i, Ericsson T28/T29, Sony Z5, Siemens SL45i and other once expensive flagship devices. Or is it an attempt to fulfill your dream, which at one time did not come true, because there was simply no money? One way or another, buying a “vintage” model is not the best thing to do, in my opinion, technology has come a long way lately, and using such a device will bring nothing but disappointment. Each vegetable has its own time, and trying to deceive yourself is hardly worth it, and it is unlikely to succeed.

Everything in the world is connected, and people who develop and sell new models of phones are as dependent on gadget addicts as they are on them. After all, it is this part of consumers that offers new use cases, new opportunities, tests and refines old ones, pushes manufacturers to create new trends. And, on the contrary, manufacturers offer more and more new features and functions, some of them will sink into oblivion, and some, like the built-in camera, are becoming the norm. Therefore, when a phone from a large company falls into the hands of a patient (forgive me), then just the device is not enough. He wants to get something else from the company that made and sold him the phone (sold, of course, by another company, but that's not the point). It can be an advertising image with which you can associate yourself and enjoy it. This may be additional free software for both his phone model and computer. These may be free services. This can be an accessory or program received for a completed questionnaire. And finally, why does no one give music as a gift? Or video content adapted for viewing? There are such examples, but they are few, very few.

In one of the materials devoted to gadget addiction, there were even such tips for getting rid of this terrible disease, below I will give my comments.

How to get rid of a gadget dependency:

  • limit the time you use the device to one hour a day;

Alas, there is no way to limit communication with the phone to one hour, it is simply unrealistic. Many people put the device down just before going to bed, and before going to bed they read a book on their phone, answer a couple of SMS, listen to music.

  • limit yourself to buying a new gadget or accessory to the old one every three months;

Alas, this is quite difficult to do. Every month, more and more new phones and smartphones appear on the market that offer new functionality (or the old one in a new wrapper, which is also curious), many models are actively advertised. Moreover, advertising accompanies patients with gadget addiction everywhere - in your favorite magazine, on the Internet, on the street, on the radio, and even in your mobile phone, you can find it by going to the manufacturer's website. Therefore, it's just itching to take it and change your model, without waiting until the prescribed two or three months are over. By the way, when you hear this particular figure from many, it’s not entirely clear where it came from, it’s more logical to change the device once a year, during this time a new generation will appear, functionality will change, new “chips” will be added. In addition, now, when buying a phone, it’s already time for sellers to ask: “What do you need a phone for?”.We all have our own priorities - someone likes to listen to music and radio from a mobile phone, someone likes to take pictures, others need a good address book and a well-organized organizer ... If you divide the devices in this way and buy according to priorities, then the need for a purchase will immediately disappear. As for musical devices, there are now three models on the market that deserve special attention; I think they will remain among the best for a long time. These are Nokia N91, SE W950i and Motorola ROKR E2, according to the combination of their characteristics, these devices will not be shameful to buy and use in a year. By the way, as an N91 user, it was extremely disappointing for me to see the quite predictable appearance of a model with an 8 GB hard drive, although I thought that, in addition to black and 4 GB, something else would be added - a slot for memory cards, a better screen, for example . Now the owners of the 91st are sluggishly and sadly discussing on the forum whether it is worth changing the device or is it an empty task. In my opinion, it would be quite relevant for Nokia to offer the owners of the “old” 91st a replacement for an updated version with an additional payment of 150 euros (a purely speculative figure), but this will not happen, because it can never be. And gadget-addicted people will certainly sell their "outdated" 91s for the sake of imaginary benefits.

By the way, about advertising, I think it's time to make a separate chapter in the reviews, dedicated to the images that it carries. After all, it becomes not enough for consumers to simply have a device, even a very good one, they want to be presented with an image that will fuel the fire of love for this phone. Therefore, the motives of companies that advertise their devices without people in the frame or in the photo are not entirely clear. After all, we, volens-nolens, thinking about buying a new product, also think about how we will Free classifieds in Kariti look with this phone , will others know that I have such and such a phone in my hand, and not another? The ad also shows what we're going to look like and gives hope that others will know: this guy has the machine that Gary Oldman advertised, model such and such, that's cool, wow! If there is no advertising or it is faceless, then even the best device will not attract the attention of the general public. As for gadget-addicted consumers, the situation is twofold: on the one hand, they are “by rank” supposed to understand new products and not respond to advertising, on the other hand, they are the most susceptible to advertising, since it is on the basis of news, reviews on some resources, rumors, etc. begin to dream of owning one or another object.

  • if you feel like working on a gadget, call a friend or go for a walk;

In my opinion, this method may well be effective, but what does it mean to "engage in a gadget"? Is it listening to music, reading, playing games or what? It seems to me that “getting busy with a gadget” is his thoughtless squeezing or walking through the menu for the hundredth time in search of something new (well, there is, of course, no new there). That's when it's probably worth calling someone, running on the spot or doing gymnastics.

  • invite friends over more often;

The path, as they say, "from the evil one" - the frequent presence of friends in the house means ruin and oblivion of all hopes for a good life. Indeed, is it an adequate replacement - instead of using gadgets, constant parties? And isn't that worse? Probably, this means real communication with people, and not replacing it with communication with a mobile phone.

  • make yourself wait a day or two before buying a new gadget;

The advice, by the way, is extremely good. Often the decision to buy is made on the basis of reading forums, the impact of advertising, familiarization with the model on websites, the advice of friends, but not on the basis of the results of hand-feeling. Therefore, before buying a phone in an online store, try to look at it somewhere, understand what you need it for, how it will fit into the infrastructure around you. Often, the purchase decision is canceled instantly if the difference between an imaginary and a real phone is large. If the purchase occurs, then the gadget-addictive person, who went into a stupor from this difference, immediately posts a message about the sale somewhere on the forum with the wording: “It didn’t fit.”

  • Read the user manuals of your gadgets carefully to make sure you get the most out of them.

Cool and up-to-date advice. The only thing I would advise all patients to take up the instructions after a month of using a new phone - perhaps this will help you play with the phone for some more time.

By the way, one seriously ill gadget-addicted person in the team, if he has a well-spoken tongue, can captivate the rest. Surely you understand what I'm talking about - all these discussions of the good and bad sides of this or that device, the demonstration of more and more devices (and it hasn't even been a month since he had another phone), a negative attitude towards those who do not changes his phone for a long time ... It’s bad if this person is an informal leader, people believe in such people, and it seems that someone who understands gadgets lives a full life, with adventures (“Barely had time on the forum for a ridiculous price buy an N phone”), constantly overcoming obstacles (“Still, I was able to watch a movie on it in such and such a format!”), A wide circle of communication (“I have ICQ, and Skype, and MSN, and e-mail I can take it anywhere." As a rule, this is not true or not true at all. However, it’s not for me to judge, it’s just that, in my opinion, there are many other equally interesting topics for conversations during breaks at work / between lectures / between lessons.

A friend of mine answered the question of whether he was going to change the handset in the near future, and, if so, to which device, he answered simply. Yes, I must say that this person can afford to buy an expensive device without any problems. So, his answer was simple and elegant, a person got rid of the disease by acquiring another: “You see, you still won’t achieve the ideal in the constant improvement of any electronic nonsense. But improving health is a much more important task, moreover, this is money invested in yourself, and not lost for the sake of momentary pleasure. Simple thought, isn't it? After all, if you add up all the money that a gadget-addicted person spends on his “hobby” per year, then they would be enough for a subscription to a not the worst sports club. Or for a trip somewhere. Or an exercise bike. I personally think that is correct.

This "dangerous" gadget addiction

This material does not pretend to be scientific or even pseudo-scientific. To believe or not to believe in what will be discussed is your own business, the author does not try to impose his point of view with a single word. But to the question of faith, it is worth asking the question (sorry for the tautology): why do you need a mobile phone? How often do you change your devices? How many phones do you have now, and if there are more than two, is it justified? If you have an iPod, then why do you also need a music phone? Can you donate something for your home or for yourself to upgrade your gadgets?

The term "gadget addiction" appeared not so long ago, I personally heard it for the first time at the end of last year. It was then that a wave of various notes, articles and other information about this type of addiction swept through the Internet, the literal translation means “an acute desire for things” - gadgets are called any electronic small things like mobile phones, players, voice recorders, PDAs, etc., some are small laptops also fall under this concept. I would not like to retell what has long been discussed and forgotten, rather, the purpose of this material is to speculate on the topic of people's dependence on the technology that surrounds them. After all, in the end, for the sake of buying a cell phone, we spend money, and many people earn money for more than one month, wasting their time and effort. In return for these very forces and time, we get a small little thing, which, in addition to its main task (and these are still conversational functions, and nothing else), can do a lot more, but is the exchange adequate?

Dreams of an ideal phone are often devoted to entire topics on the forums, people argue about what it should be, what its form factor can be, what its functionality is. Sometimes interlocutors get tired of listing all their desires and say this: “In general, my phone is the best, and I don’t need anything else.”

And that's why the concept of using two phones, which Mads Winblad talked about, quite allows gadget addicts to own two devices at once. For example, one is used as a daily one, has a good player, the second is a smartphone with a powerful camera. Such kits have been advertised for quite a long time, suffice it to recall the combination of Nokia 6230i and Nokia 9500. Nobody bothers to make other “pairs”, for example, it can be the same Nokia 8800 SE and Nokia N91, a rich iron kit of a bored businessman. Or a schoolboy, because…

Because consumer lending, in fact, has killed all the charm of a one-time purchase of an expensive device. Let's say, when I bought a Nokia 9500 almost at the very beginning of sales, it was very disappointing to see a rather young man with the same communicator. I don’t think it was a gift from his parents, clothes, habits, some other details clearly indicated that he was not taken to school in a Bently. Rather, this techi thumped all his capital into the first installment for an expensive machine. There is no point in such a purchase, in my opinion - this is a typical manifestation of gadget addiction, the purchase of the desired thing for the sake of the purchase process itself, and not for the sake of subsequent at least some long and effective use.

By the way, young people are considered to be the most gadget-addicted, this is explained quite simply - they are most susceptible to advertising, the fact that someone can own an even “cooler” model, in the youth environment, the model and brand of the phone can say about the certain wealth of its owner. In general, the phone is a kind of pen in the head, by which others judge a person.

One more question: isn't there a purchase of a "vintage" model, which has recently become almost a fashionable act among people of a certain mindset, an attempt to atone for guilt before oneself for the fact that for a long, long time hard-earned money was spent on expensive toys that are changed every two months? As some used device dealers say, there is always a demand for some of the former elite models. These are such phones as Nokia 8850, Motorola V60i, Ericsson T28/T29, Sony Z5, Siemens SL45i and other once expensive flagship devices. Or is it an attempt to fulfill your dream, which at one time did not come true, because there was simply no money? One way or another, buying a “vintage” model is not the best thing to do, in my opinion, technology has come a long way lately, and using such a device will bring nothing but disappointment. Each vegetable has its own time, and trying to deceive yourself is hardly worth it, and it is unlikely to succeed.

In one of the materials devoted to gadget addiction, there were even such tips for getting rid of this terrible disease, below I will give my comments.

How to get rid of a gadget dependency:

  • limit the time you use the device to one hour a day;

Alas, there is no way to limit communication with the phone to one hour, it is simply unrealistic. Many people put the device down just before going to bed, and before going to bed they read a book on their phone, answer a couple of SMS, listen to music.

  • limit yourself to buying a new gadget or accessory to the old one every three months;

Alas, this is quite difficult to do. Every month, more and more new phones and smartphones appear on the market that offer new functionality (or the old one in a new wrapper, which is also curious), many models are actively advertised. Moreover, advertising accompanies patients with gadget addiction everywhere - in your favorite magazine, on the Internet, on the street, on the radio, and even in your mobile phone, you can find it by going to the manufacturer's website. Therefore, it's just itching to take it and change your model, without waiting until the prescribed two or three months are over. By the way, when you hear this particular figure from many, it’s not entirely clear where it came from, it’s more logical to change the device once a year, during this time a new generation will appear, functionality will change, new “chips” will be added. In addition, now, when buying a phone, it’s already time for sellers to ask: “What do you need a phone for?”.We all have our own priorities - someone likes to listen to music and radio from a mobile phone, someone likes to take pictures, others need a good address book and a well-organized organizer ... If you divide the devices in this way and buy according to priorities, then the need for a purchase will immediately disappear. As for musical devices, there are now three models on the market that deserve special attention; I think they will remain among the best for a long time. These are Nokia N91, SE W950i and Motorola ROKR E2, according to the combination of their characteristics, these devices will not be shameful to buy and use in a year. By the way, as an N91 user, it was extremely disappointing for me to see the quite predictable appearance of a model with an 8 GB hard drive, although I thought that, in addition to black and 4 GB, something else would be added - a slot for memory cards, a better screen, for example . Now the owners of the 91st are sluggishly and sadly discussing on the forum whether it is worth changing the device or is it an empty task. In my opinion, it would be quite relevant for Nokia to offer the owners of the “old” 91st a replacement for an updated version with an additional payment of 150 euros (a purely speculative figure), but this will not happen, because it can never be. And gadget-addicted people will certainly sell their "outdated" 91s for the sake of imaginary benefits.

By the way, about advertising, I think it's time to make a separate chapter in the reviews, dedicated to the images that it carries. After all, it becomes not enough for consumers to simply have a device, even a very good one, they want to be presented with an image that will fuel the fire of love for this phone. Therefore, the motives of companies that advertise their devices without people in the frame or in the photo are not entirely clear. After all, we, volens-nolens, thinking about buying a new product, also think about how we will Free classifieds in Kariti look with this phone , will others know that I have such and such a phone in my hand, and not another? The ad also shows what we're going to look like and gives hope that others will know: this guy has the machine that Gary Oldman advertised, model such and such, that's cool, wow! If there is no advertising or it is faceless, then even the best device will not attract the attention of the general public. As for gadget-addicted consumers, the situation is twofold: on the one hand, they are “by rank” supposed to understand new products and not respond to advertising, on the other hand, they are the most susceptible to advertising, since it is on the basis of news, reviews on some resources, rumors, etc. begin to dream of owning one or another object.

  • Read the operating instructions for your gadgets carefully to make sure you get the most out of them.

Cool and up-to-date advice. The only thing I would advise all patients to take up the instructions after a month of using a new phone - perhaps this will help you play with the phone for some more time.

By the way, one seriously ill gadget-addicted person in the team, if he has a well-spoken tongue, can captivate the rest. Surely you understand what I'm talking about - all these discussions of the good and bad sides of this or that device, the demonstration of more and more devices (and it hasn't even been a month since he had another phone), a negative attitude towards those who do not changes his phone for a long time ... It’s bad if this person is an informal leader, people believe in such people, and it seems that someone who understands gadgets lives a full life, with adventures (“Barely had time on the forum for a ridiculous price buy an N phone”), constantly overcoming obstacles (“Still, I was able to watch a movie on it in such and such a format!”), A wide range of communication (“I have ICQ, and Skype, and MSN, and e-mail I can take it anywhere." As a rule, this is not true or not true at all. However, it’s not for me to judge, it’s just that, in my opinion, there are many other equally interesting topics for conversations during breaks at work / between lectures / between lessons.

Another interesting topic to think about is sales and exchanges of mobile phones. In my opinion, this is another thing that is a kind of log in the fire of consumption. A few years ago, when the phone was not yet a toy, but rather a utilitarian, albeit expensive, item, the very idea of ​​using it for three months, and then selling or exchanging it, was a complete nonsense. Now, almost every gadget-addicted patient can enjoy not only the use of his device, but also the process of selling somewhere on the forum, among the same brothers in mind. No, do not think that I consider this shameful - I myself constantly do this, and this is generally a separate topic for conversation (and for an article). But the fact remains - now there are no barriers to getting rid of the old gadget, with a certain skill it can be sold at a good price, add more money and buy a new toy. Another option is to change your device to another one, with or without a surcharge. The exchange of electronic toys is somewhat similar to the exchange in kindergarten: “Let me give you a Sony PSP and SE K750i, and you give me your wonderful Nokia N73. I’ll also give you a memory card, a headset and a thousand rubles.” Funny? But this is a common thing among gadget-addicted personalities, another side of the "stormy" life. And those who explain what is happening like this: “This is just my hobby, I like to change / sell my gadgets for the sake of getting a new experience,” are a little disingenuous. What do you think of this?

A friend of mine answered the question of whether he was going to change the handset in the near future, and, if so, to which device, he answered simply. Yes, I must say that this person can afford to buy an expensive device without any problems. So, his answer was simple and elegant, a person got rid of the disease by acquiring another: “You see, you still won’t achieve the ideal in the constant improvement of any electronic nonsense. But improving health is a much more important task, moreover, this is money invested in yourself, and not lost for the sake of momentary pleasure. Simple thought, isn't it? After all, if you add up all the money that a gadget-addicted person spends on his “hobby” per year, then they would be enough for a subscription to a not the worst sports club. Or for a trip somewhere. Or an exercise bike. I personally think that is correct.

This "dangerous" gadget addiction

This material does not pretend to be scientific or even pseudo-scientific. To believe or not to believe in what will be discussed is your own business, the author does not try to impose his point of view with a single word. But to the question of faith, it is worth asking the question (sorry for the tautology): why do you need a mobile phone? How often do you change your devices? How many phones do you have now, and if there are more than two, is it justified? If you have an iPod, then why do you also need a music phone? Can you donate buying something for your home or for yourself to upgrade your electronic gadgets?

The term "gadget addiction" appeared not so long ago, I personally heard it for the first time at the end of last year. It was then that a wave of various notes, articles and other information about this type of addiction swept through the Internet, the literal translation means “an acute desire for things” - gadgets are called any electronic small things like mobile phones, players, voice recorders, PDAs, etc., some are small laptops also fall under this concept. I would not like to retell what has long been discussed and forgotten, rather, the purpose of this material is to speculate on the topic of people's dependence on the technology that surrounds them. After all, in the end, for the sake of buying a cell phone, we spend money, and many people earn money for more than one month, wasting their time and effort. In return for these very forces and time, we get a small little thing, which, in addition to its main task (and these are still conversational functions, and nothing else), can do a lot more, but is the exchange adequate?

Dreams of an ideal phone are often devoted to entire topics on the forums, people argue about what it should be, what its form factor can be, what its functionality is. Sometimes interlocutors get tired of listing all their desires and say this: “In general, my phone is the best, and I don’t need anything else.”

And that's why the concept of using two phones, which Mads Winblad talked about, quite allows gadget addicts to own two devices at once. For example, one is used as a daily one, has a good player, the second is a smartphone with a powerful camera. Such kits have been advertised for quite a long time, suffice it to recall the combination of Nokia 6230i and Nokia 9500. Nobody bothers to make other “pairs”, for example, it can be the same Nokia 8800 SE and Nokia N91, a rich iron kit of a bored businessman. Or a schoolboy, because…

Because consumer lending, in fact, has killed all the charm of a one-time purchase of an expensive device. Let's say, when I bought a Nokia 9500 almost at the very beginning of sales, it was very disappointing to see a rather young man with the same communicator. I don’t think it was a gift from his parents, clothes, habits, some other details clearly indicated that he was not taken to school in a Bently. Rather, this techi thumped all his capital into the first installment for an expensive machine. There is no point in such a purchase, in my opinion - this is a typical manifestation of gadget addiction, the purchase of the desired thing for the sake of the purchase process itself, and not for the sake of subsequent at least some long and effective use.

Everything in the world is connected, and people who develop and sell new models of phones are as dependent on gadget addicts as they are on them. After all, it is this part of consumers that offers new use cases, new opportunities, tests and refines old ones, pushes manufacturers to create new trends. And, on the contrary, manufacturers offer more and more new features and functions, some of them will sink into oblivion, and some, like the built-in camera, are becoming the norm. Therefore, when a phone from a large company falls into the hands of a patient (forgive me), then just the device is not enough. He wants to get something else from the company that made and sold him the phone (sold, of course, by another company, but that's not the point). It can be an advertising image with which you can associate yourself and enjoy it. This may be additional free software for both his phone model and computer. These may be free services. This can be an accessory or program received for a completed questionnaire. And finally, why does no one give music as a gift? Or video content adapted for viewing? There are such examples, but they are few, very few.

By the way, about advertising, I think it's time to make a separate chapter in the reviews, dedicated to the images that it carries. After all, it becomes not enough for consumers to simply have a device, even a very good one, they want to be presented with an image that will fuel the fire of love for this phone. Therefore, the motives of companies that advertise their devices without people in the frame or in the photo are not entirely clear. After all, we, volens-nolens, thinking about buying a new product, also think about how we will Free classifieds in Kariti look with this phone , will others know that I have such and such a phone in my hand, and not another? The ad also shows what we're going to look like and gives hope that others will know: this guy has the machine that Gary Oldman advertised, model such and such, that's cool, wow! If there is no advertising or it is faceless, then even the best device will not attract the attention of the general public. As for gadget-addicted consumers, the situation is twofold: on the one hand, they are “by rank” supposed to understand new products and not respond to advertising, on the other hand, they are the most susceptible to advertising, since it is on the basis of news, reviews on some resources, rumors, etc. begin to dream of owning one or another object.

  • Read the user manuals of your gadgets carefully to make sure you get the most out of them.

Cool and up-to-date advice. The only thing I would advise all patients to take up the instructions after a month of using a new phone - perhaps this will help you play with the phone for some more time.

By the way, one seriously ill gadget-addicted person in the team, if he has a well-spoken tongue, can captivate the rest. Surely you understand what I'm talking about - all these discussions of the good and bad sides of this or that device, the demonstration of more and more devices (and it hasn't even been a month since he had another phone), a negative attitude towards those who do not changes his phone for a long time ... It’s bad if this person is an informal leader, people believe in such people, and it seems that someone who understands gadgets lives a full life, with adventures (“Barely had time on the forum for a ridiculous price buy an N phone”), constantly overcoming obstacles (“Still, I was able to watch a movie on it in such and such a format!”), A wide circle of communication (“I have ICQ, and Skype, and MSN, and e-mail I can take it anywhere." As a rule, this is not true or not true at all. However, it’s not for me to judge, it’s just that, in my opinion, there are many other equally interesting topics for conversations during breaks at work / between lectures / between lessons.

Another interesting topic to think about is sales and exchanges of mobile phones. In my opinion, this is another thing that is a kind of log in the fire of consumption. A few years ago, when the phone was not yet a toy, but rather a utilitarian, albeit expensive, item, the very idea of ​​using it for three months, and then selling or exchanging it, was a complete nonsense. Now, almost every gadget-addicted patient can enjoy not only the use of his device, but also the process of selling somewhere on the forum, among the same brothers in mind. No, do not think that I consider this shameful - I myself constantly do this, and this is generally a separate topic for conversation (and for an article). But the fact remains - now there are no barriers to getting rid of the old gadget, with a certain skill it can be sold at a good price, add more money and buy a new toy. Another option is to change your device to another one, with or without a surcharge. The exchange of electronic toys is somewhat similar to the exchange in kindergarten: “Let me give you a Sony PSP and SE K750i, and you give me your wonderful Nokia N73. I’ll also give you a memory card, a headset and a thousand rubles.” Funny? But this is a common thing among gadget-addicted personalities, another side of the "stormy" life. And those who explain what is happening like this: “This is just my hobby, I like to change / sell my gadgets for the sake of getting a new experience,” are a little disingenuous. What do you think of this?

A friend of mine answered the question of whether he was going to change the handset in the near future, and, if so, to which device, he answered simply. Yes, I must say that this person can afford to buy an expensive device without any problems. So, his answer was simple and elegant, a person got rid of the disease by acquiring another: “You see, you still won’t achieve the ideal in the constant improvement of any electronic nonsense. But improving health is a much more important task, moreover, this is money invested in yourself, and not lost for the sake of momentary pleasure. Simple thought, isn't it? After all, if you add up all the money that a gadget-addicted person spends on his “hobby” per year, then they would be enough for a subscription to a not the worst sports club. Or for a trip somewhere. Or an exercise bike. I personally think that is correct.

This "dangerous" gadget addiction

This material does not pretend to be scientific or even pseudo-scientific. To believe or not to believe in what will be discussed is your own business, the author does not try to impose his point of view with a single word. But to the question of faith, it is worth asking the question (sorry for the tautology): why do you need a mobile phone? How often do you change your devices? How many phones do you have now, and if there are more than two, is it justified? If you have an iPod, then why do you also need a music phone? Can you donate buying something for your home or for yourself to upgrade your electronic gadgets?

The term "gadget addiction" appeared not so long ago, I personally heard it for the first time at the end of last year. It was then that a wave of various notes, articles and other information about this type of addiction swept through the Internet, the literal translation means “an acute desire for things” - gadgets are called any electronic small things like mobile phones, players, voice recorders, PDAs, etc., some are small laptops also fall under this concept. I would not like to retell what has long been discussed and forgotten, rather, the purpose of this material is to speculate on the topic of people's dependence on the technology that surrounds them. After all, in the end, for the sake of buying a cell phone, we spend money, and many earn money for more than one month, wasting their time and effort. Instead of these very forces and time, we get a small little thing, which, in addition to its main task (and these are still conversational functions, and nothing else), can do a lot more, but is the exchange adequate?

The dreams of an ideal phone are often devoted to entire topics on the forums, people argue about what it should be, what its form factor can be, what its functionality is. Sometimes interlocutors get tired of listing all their desires and say this: “In general, my phone is the best, and I don’t need anything else.”

In my opinion, no one needs an ideal phone and will never be created. Because buying something ideal is the end of the path of hope, the achievement of a certain goal, but what's next? Let's say you bought the perfect phone that has no flaws in both hardware and software, it's beautiful, very functional, simply the best at the moment. I am sure that most patients with gadget addiction will play enough with it for three weeks, and then, in despair, they will be ready to buy the most, as they say, “buggy” device, if only they could spend their time on it, flashing, installing new software, discussing forums for shortcomings, buying more accessories, etc. etc. Those who are called techi (logically, the fifth column of gadget addicts is hiding among them) certainly do not need a perfect phone, otherwise the very meaning of the purchase will disappear.

To give you a simple example, when techi buys a very good phone, like the Nokia 8800, the “playing” process takes from a week to a month, somewhere in that range. Yes, the design of this device seems ideal to many, but it's not far from the truth. Yes, thanks to advertising, rumors and other events around 8800, the atmosphere of a luxurious little thing has been created, which needs the right environment. But the 8800 is not the kind of device that you can dig into for a long time or do all sorts of experiments with it, it’s a luxurious, but rather ordinary “dialer” that a techi representative can buy only by succumbing to advertising impulses.

And that's why the concept of using two phones, which Mads Winblad talked about, quite allows gadget addicts to own two devices at once. For example, one is used as a daily one, has a good player, the second is a smartphone with a powerful camera. Such kits have been advertised for quite a long time, suffice it to recall the combination of Nokia 6230i and Nokia 9500. Nobody bothers to make other “pairs”, for example, it can be the same Nokia 8800 SE and Nokia N91, a rich iron kit of a bored businessman. Or a schoolboy, because…

Because consumer lending, in fact, has killed all the charm of a one-time purchase of an expensive device. Let's say, when I bought a Nokia 9500 almost at the very beginning of sales, it was very disappointing to see a rather young man with the same communicator. I don’t think it was a gift from his parents, clothes, habits, some other details clearly indicated that he was not taken to school in a Bently. Rather, this techi thumped all his capital into the first installment for an expensive machine. There is no point in such a purchase, in my opinion - this is a typical manifestation of gadget addiction, the purchase of the desired thing for the sake of the purchase process itself, and not for the sake of subsequent at least some long and effective use.

By the way, young people are considered to be the most gadget-addicted, this is explained quite simply - they are most susceptible to advertising, the fact that someone can own an even “cooler” model, in the youth environment, the model and brand of the phone can say about the certain wealth of its owner. In general, the phone is a kind of pen in the head, by which others judge a person.

One more question: isn't there a purchase of a "vintage" model, which has recently become almost a fashionable act among people of a certain mindset, an attempt to atone for guilt before oneself for the fact that for a long, long time hard-earned money was spent on expensive toys that are changed every two months? As some used device sellers say, there is always a demand for some of the former elite models. These are such phones as Nokia 8850, Motorola V60i, Ericsson T28/T29, Sony Z5, Siemens SL45i and other once expensive flagship devices. Or is it an attempt to fulfill your dream, which at one time did not come true, because there was simply no money? One way or another, buying a “vintage” model is not the best thing to do, in my opinion, technology has come a long way lately, and using such a device will bring nothing but disappointment. Each vegetable has its own time, and trying to deceive yourself is hardly worth it, and it is unlikely to succeed.

Everything in the world is connected, and people who develop and sell new models of phones are as dependent on gadget addicts as they are on them. After all, it is this part of consumers that offers new use cases, new opportunities, tests and refines old ones, pushes manufacturers to create new trends. And, on the contrary, manufacturers offer more and more new features and functions, some of them will sink into oblivion, and some, like the built-in camera, are becoming the norm. Therefore, when a phone from a large company falls into the hands of a patient (forgive me), then just the device is not enough. He wants to get something else from the company that made and sold him the phone (sold, of course, by another company, but that's not the point). It can be an advertising image with which you can associate yourself and enjoy it. This may be additional free software for both his phone model and computer. These may be free services. This can be an accessory or program received for a completed questionnaire. And finally, why does no one give music as a gift? Or video content adapted for viewing? There are such examples, but they are few, very few.

In one of the materials devoted to gadget addiction, there were even such tips for getting rid of this terrible disease, below I will give my comments.

How to get rid of a gadget dependency:

  • limit the time you use the device to one hour a day;

Unfortunately, there is no way to limit communication with the phone to one hour, it is simply unrealistic. Many people put down the device just before going to bed, and before going to bed they read a book on their phone, answer a couple of SMS, listen to music.

  • limit yourself to buying a new gadget or accessory to the old one every three months;

Alas, this is quite difficult to do. Every month, more and more new phones and smartphones appear on the market that offer new functionality (or the old one in a new wrapper, which is also curious), many models are actively advertised. Moreover, advertising accompanies patients with gadget addiction everywhere - in your favorite magazine, on the Internet, on the street, on the radio, and even in your mobile phone, you can find it by going to the manufacturer's website. Therefore, it is simply itching to take it and change your model, without waiting until the prescribed two or three months are over. By the way, when you hear this particular figure from many, it’s not entirely clear where it came from, it’s more logical to change the device once a year, during this time a new generation will appear, functionality will change, new “chips” will be added. In addition, now, when buying a phone, it’s already time for sellers to ask: “What do you need a phone for?”.We all have our own priorities - someone likes to listen to music and radio from a mobile phone, someone likes to take pictures, others need a good address book and a well-organized organizer ... If you divide the devices in this way and buy according to priorities, then the need for a purchase will immediately disappear. As for musical devices, there are now three models on the market that deserve special attention; I think they will remain among the best for a long time. These are Nokia N91, SE W950i and Motorola ROKR E2, according to the combination of their characteristics, these devices will not be shameful to buy and use in a year. By the way, as an N91 user, it was extremely disappointing for me to see the quite predictable appearance of a model with an 8 GB hard drive, although I thought that, in addition to black and 4 GB, something else would be added - a slot for memory cards, a better screen, for example . Now the owners of the 91st are sluggishly and sadly discussing on the forum whether it is worth changing the device or is it an empty task. In my opinion, it would be quite relevant for Nokia to offer the owners of the “old” 91st a replacement for an updated version with an additional payment of 150 euros (a purely speculative figure), but this will not happen, because it can never be. And gadget-addicted people will certainly sell their "outdated" 91s for the sake of imaginary benefits.

By the way, regarding advertising, it seems to me that in the reviews it is already time to make a separate chapter dedicated to the images that it carries in itself. After all, it becomes not enough for consumers to simply have a device, even a very good one, they want to be presented with an image that will fuel the fire of love for this phone. Therefore, the motives of companies that advertise their devices without people in the frame or in the photo are not entirely clear. After all, we, volens-nolens, thinking about buying a new product, also think about how we will Free classifieds in Kariti Free classifieds in Kariti look with this phone, will others know that I have such and such a phone in my hand, and not another? The ad also shows what we're going to look like and gives hope that others will know: this guy has the machine that Gary Oldman advertised, model such and such, that's cool, wow! If there is no advertising or it is faceless, then even the best device will not attract the attention of the general public. As for gadget-addicted consumers, the situation is twofold: on the one hand, they are “by rank” supposed to understand new products and not respond to advertising, on the other hand, they are the most susceptible to advertising, since it is on the basis of news, reviews on some resources, rumors, etc. begin to dream of owning this or that object.
  • if you feel like working on a gadget, call a friend or go for a walk;

In my opinion, this method may well be effective, but what does it mean to "engage in a gadget"? Is it listening to music, reading, playing games or what? It seems to me that “getting busy with a gadget” is his thoughtless squeezing or walking through the menu for the hundredth time in search of something new (well, there is, of course, no new there). That's when it's probably worth calling someone, running on the spot or doing gymnastics.

  • invite friends over more often;

The path, as they say, "from the evil one" - the frequent presence of friends in the house means ruin and oblivion of all hopes for a good life. Indeed, is it an adequate replacement - instead of using gadgets, constant parties? And isn't that worse? Probably, this means real communication with people, and not replacing it with communication with a mobile phone.

  • make yourself wait a day or two before buying a new gadget;

The advice, by the way, is extremely good. Often the decision to buy is made on the basis of reading forums, the impact of advertising, familiarization with the model on websites, the advice of friends, but not on the basis of the results of hand-feeling. Therefore, before buying a phone in an online store, try to look at it somewhere, understand what you need it for, how it will fit into the infrastructure around you. Often, the purchase decision is canceled instantly if the difference between an imaginary and a real phone is large. If the purchase occurs, then the gadget-addictive person, who went into a stupor from this difference, immediately posts a message about the sale somewhere on the forum with the wording: “It didn’t fit.”

  • Read the operating instructions for your gadgets carefully to make sure you get the most out of them.

Cool and up-to-date advice. The only thing I would advise all patients to take up the instructions after a month of using a new phone - perhaps this will help you play with the phone for some more time.

By the way, one seriously ill gadget-addicted person in the team, if he has a well-spoken tongue, can captivate the rest. Surely you understand what I'm talking about - all these discussions of the good and bad sides of this or that device, the demonstration of more and more devices (and it hasn't even been a month since he had another phone), a negative attitude towards those who do not changes his phone for a long time ... It’s bad if this person is an informal leader, people believe in such people, and it seems that someone who understands gadgets lives a full life, with adventures (“Barely had time on the forum for a ridiculous price buy an N phone”), constantly overcoming obstacles (“Still, I was able to watch a movie on it in such and such a format!”), A wide range of communication (“I have ICQ, and Skype, and MSN, and e-mail I can take it anywhere." As a rule, this is not true or not true at all. However, it’s not for me to judge, it’s just that, in my opinion, there are many other equally interesting topics for conversations during breaks at work / between lectures / between lessons.

Another interesting topic to think about is sales and exchanges of mobile phones. In my opinion, this is another thing that is a kind of log in the fire of consumption. A few years ago, when the phone was not yet a toy, but rather a utilitarian, albeit expensive, item, the very idea of ​​using it for three months, and then selling or exchanging it, was a complete nonsense. Now, almost every gadget-addicted patient can enjoy not only the use of his device, but also the process of selling somewhere on the forum, among the same brothers in mind. No, do not think that I consider this shameful - I myself constantly do this, and this is generally a separate topic for conversation (and for an article). But the fact remains - now there are no barriers to getting rid of the old gadget, with a certain skill it can be sold at a good price, add more money and buy a new toy. Another option is to change your device to another one, with or without a surcharge. The exchange of electronic toys is somewhat similar to the exchange in kindergarten: “Let me give you a Sony PSP and SE K750i, and you give me your wonderful Nokia N73. I’ll also give you a memory card, a headset and a thousand rubles.” Funny? But this is a common thing among gadget-addicted personalities, another side of the "stormy" life. And those who explain what is happening like this: “This is just my hobby, I like to change / sell my gadgets for the sake of getting a new experience,” are a little disingenuous. What do you think of this?

A friend of mine answered the question of whether he was going to change the handset in the near future, and, if so, to which device, he answered simply. Yes, I must say that this person can afford to buy an expensive device without any problems. So, his answer was simple and elegant, a person got rid of the disease by acquiring another: “You see, you still won’t achieve the ideal in the constant improvement of any electronic nonsense. But improving health is a much more important task, moreover, this is money invested in yourself, and not lost for the sake of momentary pleasure. Simple thought, isn't it? After all, if you add up all the money that a gadget-addicted person spends on his “hobby” per year, then they would be enough for a subscription to a not the worst sports club. Or for a trip somewhere. Or an exercise bike. I personally think that is correct.