Review. "Smart crowd: a new social revolution"

Original title: Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution
Author: Howard Reingold
Publisher: FAIR-PRESS
Year of issue : 2006
Bound: hard
ISBN: 5-8183-1004-3, 0-7382-0861-2
Number of pages: 416
Circulation: 2000 copies.
Format: 60x90/16

To be honest, the presence on the cover of such words as smartmob, flashmob, for a long time made me look at other publications and skip this particular book. The release of the book on the wave of popularity of all kinds of mobs made one doubt its interestingness. One evening at a European airport, there was no other choice but to purchase this book, since other options were even less preferable. It's nice to be wrong in the original premises, the book is extremely interesting and written with a very deep approach to the subject, it analyzes many social aspects that arise during the popularization of mobile communications. Already in Moscow I found a Russian-language edition, and the review was written on the basis of this version of the book.

The summary of the book doesn't look very interesting:

“Mobile communications and ubiquitous computerization are already beginning to change the ways of communication, labor and creative activity, trade, and management. Information technology and its manifold impact on various areas of society - this is the theme of the book, brought to the attention of numerous studies, observations and interviews, the main places of the population of the Earth will be flooded with microcircuits capable of communicating with each other. People equipped with such devices will form "smart crowds", and their communication will take on forms and possibilities never seen before.

The original edition of the book was published in 2002, and a Russian translation appeared 4 years later. So much has changed in the mobile communication market in 5 years that it would seem that such work, work, is already hopelessly outdated. However, the book focuses on social change, omits technical details or looks at them in terms of their impact on society and consumer behavior. The book is not outdated, it will remain relevant for a long time, and it is worth reading at least once. Without knowing the history and background of most of the changes taking place in the market, one cannot think about the present and the future. Moreover, not only those who are responsible for the development of services, networks, but also for the creation of devices can show interest in the book. This work is comprehensive, covering all areas of knowledge about mobile networks.

Think about the reputation aspect of building services on mobile networks? How is the reputation of the user related to the capability of the services themselves, what examples are there today? Banal questions cause a whole wave of reflection, and examples are by no means in the field of knowledge that most players in the market today turn to.

Let me quote from the book: “Whether the manufacturers of penny chips, wearable computers, handheld geocoded devices, location-based services, smart spaces, digital cities, or intelligent furniture, one thing is clear: in the next decade there will be many inanimate objects connected to the Internet and people connected through mobile technologies of group networks. Citizens' ability to use smart crowd information environments to create profitable adhocracies—the ability to solve social dilemmas—depends less on computing power or bandwidth than on trust and willingness to take risks. This is where reputation can say its weighty word.

Surprisingly, this paragraph includes an answer to the age-old question of many content providers: what kind of services to create so that they are popular in the market? The answer lies in the field of sociology, and not in the technical aspect. It is necessary to rely on users and offer them a qualitative improvement in life, give them a certain risk and cost, but also reward them for it. Do many people consider business in terms of not financial, but social risks? There are only a few such people in the whole world and they are extremely successful. The book also allows you to get ideas in which areas of knowledge you can look for the next breakthrough for mobile technologies.

The book contains many references to various studies, which makes the narrative by no means a private expression of the author's thoughts, gives a different view of events, theories, and perspectives. For example, here is one such reference to the report of the RAND company, which has established itself as the main developer of game theory and experimental economics.

To quote: “Network warfare is a new type of confrontation, where heroes - from terrorists and criminal gangs from the side of evil to militant public figures from the side of good - use network forms of organization, doctrines, strategies and technologies, taking into account the requirements of the information age < a href="https://jiji.co.ke/shoes/nike-air-max">Nike Air Max Shoes in Kenya. The practice of network warfare has far outstripped theory due to the increasing involvement of civilized and barbaric performers in this new kind of confrontation within society.

From the 'Battle of Seattle' to the 'Attack on America', these networks show how difficult they are to deal with; some come out victorious. They all operate in small, dispersed formations, quickly deployed anywhere, anytime. All characteristic network forms of organization, doctrines, strategies and technologies have adapted to the information age. They know how to swarm and disperse, infiltrate and destroy, as well as elude and evade. The activities they engage in are vast, from ideological battles to sabotage, and many of them involve the Internet.”

I will not bombard you with my thoughts, but as a starter I will cite a number of statements from the book, they are not without interest.

"Mann is skeptical about the current WearComp fashion:"You can hardly expect that all wearable technologies will find support. The ease with which researchers, keeping their noses in the wind of technological change, switched from smart rooms to smart clothes (always adhering to what might be called a corporate ideology) shows the danger of sweeping assumptions about the benefits of wearable technology. It is quite possible that many wearable systems, alas, will lead us in the other direction - away from personal freedom" [61]. Mann warns against WearComp, sold as a privately licensed device, which now appears as a "double agent" for another institution or enterprise that wants to control or influence people [62]. Here's a technical question with notable political implications: Who manages the information that goes into WearComp and from there to smart devices around the world?

"Surrounding the urban area in an age of mobile and ubiquitous technology, I notice the sprawling networks of personal and public devices, beacons, kiosks, electronic devices, location-based information sources and bulletin boards, load sensors and forwarding services - systems spanning the city, some of which were created according to plan (from above), others grew spontaneously (from below). Cities are the focus of dense information flows, networks and communication channels with a huge amount of information exchange. Digital city advocates are trying to understand the dynamics of all-computer cities populated by mobile communicators in order to deliberately guide architectural design, creating structures that provide security and convenience along with communication.

Review. "Smart crowd: a new social revolution"

Original title: Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution
Author: Howard Reingold
Publisher: FAIR-PRESS
Year of issue : 2006
Bound: hard
ISBN: 5-8183-1004-3, 0-7382-0861-2
Number of pages: 416
Circulation: 2000 copies.
Format: 60x90/16

To be honest, the presence on the cover of such words as smartmob, flashmob, for a long time made me look at other publications and skip this particular book. The release of the book on the wave of popularity of all kinds of mobs made one doubt its interestingness. One evening at a European airport, there was no other choice but to purchase this book, since other options were even less preferable. It's nice to be wrong in the original premises, the book is extremely interesting and written with a very deep approach to the subject, it analyzes many social aspects that arise during the popularization of mobile communications. Already in Moscow I found a Russian-language edition, and the review was written on the basis of this version of the book.

The summary of the book doesn't look very interesting:

“Mobile communications and ubiquitous computerization are already beginning to change the ways of communication, labor and creative activity, trade, and management. Information technology and its manifold impact on various areas of society - this is the theme of the book, brought to the attention of numerous studies, observations and interviews, the main places of the population of the Earth will be flooded with microcircuits capable of communicating with each other. People equipped with such devices will form "smart crowds", and their communication will take on forms and possibilities never seen before.

The original edition of the book was published in 2002, and a Russian translation appeared 4 years later. So much has changed in the mobile communication market in 5 years that it would seem that such work, work, is already hopelessly outdated. However, the book focuses on social change, omits technical details or looks at them in terms of their impact on society and consumer behavior. The book is not outdated, it will remain relevant for a long time, and it is worth reading at least once. Without knowing the history and background of most of the changes taking place in the market, one cannot think about the present and the future. Moreover, not only those who are responsible for the development of services, networks, but also for the creation of devices can show interest in the book. This work is comprehensive, covering all areas of knowledge about mobile networks.

Think about the reputation aspect of building services on mobile networks? How is the reputation of the user related to the capability of the services themselves, what examples are there today? Banal questions cause a whole wave of reflection, and examples are by no means in the field of knowledge that most players in the market today turn to.

Let me quote from the book: “Whether the manufacturers of penny chips, wearable computers, handheld geocoded devices, location-based services, smart spaces, digital cities, or intelligent furniture, one thing is clear: in the next decade there will be many inanimate objects connected to the Internet and people connected through mobile technologies of group networks. Citizens' ability to use smart crowd information environments to create profitable adhocracies—the ability to solve social dilemmas—depends less on computing power or bandwidth than on trust and willingness to take risks. This is where reputation can say its weighty word.

Surprisingly, this paragraph includes an answer to the age-old question of many content providers: what kind of services to create so that they are popular in the market? The answer lies in the field of sociology, and not in the technical aspect. It is necessary to rely on users and offer them a qualitative improvement in life, give them a certain risk and cost, but also reward them for it. Do many people consider business in terms of not financial, but social risks? There are only a few such people in the whole world and they are extremely successful. The book also allows you to get ideas in which areas of knowledge you can look for the next breakthrough for mobile technologies.

The book contains many references to various studies, which makes the narrative by no means a private expression of the author's thoughts, gives a different view of events, theories, and perspectives. For example, here is one such reference to the report of the RAND company, which has established itself as the main developer of game theory and experimental economics.

To quote: “Network warfare is a new type of confrontation, where heroes - from terrorists and criminal gangs from the side of evil to militant public figures from the side of good - use network forms of organization, doctrines, strategies and technologies, taking into account the requirements of the information age < a href="https://jiji.co.ke/shoes/nike-air-max">Nike Air Max Shoes in Kenya. The practice of network warfare has far outstripped theory due to the increasing involvement of civilized and barbaric performers in this new kind of confrontation within society.

From the 'Battle of Seattle' to the 'Attack on America', these networks show how difficult they are to deal with; some come out victorious. They all operate in small, dispersed formations, quickly deployed anywhere, anytime. All characteristic network forms of organization, doctrines, strategies and technologies have adapted to the information age. They know how to swarm and disperse, infiltrate and destroy, as well as elude and evade. The activities they engage in are vast, from ideological battles to sabotage, and many of them involve the Internet.”

I will not bombard you with my thoughts, but as a starter I will cite a number of statements from the book, they are not without interest.

"Mann is skeptical about the current WearComp fashion:"You can hardly expect that all wearable technologies will find support. The ease with which researchers, keeping their noses in the wind of technological change, switched from smart rooms to smart clothes (always adhering to what might be called a corporate ideology) shows the danger of sweeping assumptions about the benefits of wearable technology. It is quite possible that many wearable systems, alas, will lead us in the other direction - away from personal freedom" [61]. Mann warns against WearComp, sold as a privately licensed device, which now appears as a "double agent" for another institution or enterprise that wants to control or influence people [62]. Here's a technical question with notable political implications: Who manages the information that goes into WearComp and from there to smart devices around the world?

"Surrounding the urban area in an age of mobile and ubiquitous technology, I notice the sprawling networks of personal and public devices, beacons, kiosks, electronic devices, location-based information sources and bulletin boards, load sensors and forwarding services - systems spanning the city, some of which were created according to plan (from above), others grew spontaneously (from below). Cities are the focus of dense information flows, networks and communication channels with a huge amount of information exchange. Digital city advocates are trying to understand the dynamics of all-computer cities populated by mobile communicators in order to deliberately guide architectural design, creating structures that provide security and convenience along with communication.

Review. "Smart crowd: a new social revolution"

Original title: Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution
Author: Howard Reingold
Publisher: FAIR-PRESS
Year of issue : 2006
Bound: hard
ISBN: 5-8183-1004-3, 0-7382-0861-2
Number of pages: 416
Circulation: 2000 copies.
Format: 60x90/16

To be honest, the presence on the cover of such words as smartmob, flashmob, for a long time made me look at other publications and skip this particular book. The release of the book on the wave of popularity of all kinds of mobs made one doubt its interestingness. One evening at a European airport, there was no other choice but to purchase this book, since other options were even less preferable. It's nice to be wrong in the original premises, the book is extremely interesting and written with a very deep approach to the subject, it analyzes many social aspects that arise during the popularization of mobile communications. Already in Moscow I found a Russian-language edition, and the review was written on the basis of this version of the book.

The summary of the book doesn't look very interesting:

“Mobile communications and ubiquitous computerization are already beginning to change the ways of communication, labor and creative activity, trade, and management. Information technology and its manifold impact on various areas of society - this is the theme of the book, brought to the attention of numerous studies, observations and interviews, the main places of the population of the Earth will be flooded with microcircuits capable of communicating with each other. People equipped with such devices will form "smart crowds", and their communication will take on forms and possibilities never seen before.

The original edition of the book was published in 2002, and a Russian translation appeared 4 years later. So much has changed in the mobile communication market in 5 years that it would seem that such work, work, is already hopelessly outdated. However, the book focuses on social change, omits technical details or looks at them in terms of their impact on society and consumer behavior. The book is not outdated, it will remain relevant for a long time, and it is worth reading at least once. Without knowing the history and background of most of the changes taking place in the market, one cannot think about the present and the future. Moreover, not only those who are responsible for the development of services, networks, but also for the creation of devices can show interest in the book. This work is comprehensive, covering all areas of knowledge about mobile networks.

Think about the reputation aspect of building services on mobile networks? How is the reputation of the user related to the capability of the services themselves, what examples are there today? Banal questions cause a whole wave of reflection, and examples are by no means in the field of knowledge that most players in the market today turn to.

Let me quote from the book: “Whether the manufacturers of penny chips, wearable computers, handheld geocoded devices, location-based services, smart spaces, digital cities, or intelligent furniture, one thing is clear: in the next decade there will be many inanimate objects connected to the Internet and people connected through mobile technologies of group networks. Citizens' ability to use smart crowd information environments to create profitable adhocracies—the ability to solve social dilemmas—depends less on computing power or bandwidth than on trust and willingness to take risks. This is where reputation can say its weighty word.

Surprisingly, this paragraph includes an answer to the age-old question of many content providers: what kind of services to create so that they are popular in the market? The answer lies in the field of sociology, and not in the technical aspect. It is necessary to rely on users and offer them a qualitative improvement in life, give them a certain risk and cost, but also reward them for it. Do many people consider business in terms of not financial, but social risks? There are only a few such people in the whole world and they are extremely successful. The book also allows you to get ideas in which areas of knowledge you can look for the next breakthrough for mobile technologies.

The book contains many references to various studies, which makes the narrative by no means a private expression of the author's thoughts, gives a different view of events, theories, and perspectives. For example, here is one such reference to the report of the RAND company, which has established itself as the main developer of game theory and experimental economics.

To quote: “Network warfare is a new type of confrontation, where heroes - from terrorists and criminal gangs from the side of evil to militant public figures from the side of good - use network forms of organization, doctrines, strategies and technologies, taking into account the requirements of the information age < a href="https://jiji.co.ke/shoes/nike-air-max">Nike Air Max Shoes in Kenya. The practice of network warfare has far outstripped theory due to the increasing involvement of civilized and barbaric performers in this new kind of confrontation within society.

From the 'Battle of Seattle' to the 'Attack on America', these networks show how difficult they are to deal with; some come out victorious. They all operate in small, dispersed formations, quickly deployed anywhere, anytime. All characteristic network forms of organization, doctrines, strategies and technologies have adapted to the information age. They know how to swarm and disperse, infiltrate and destroy, as well as elude and evade. The activities they engage in are vast, from ideological battles to sabotage, and many of them involve the Internet.”

I will not bombard you with my thoughts, but as a starter I will cite a number of statements from the book, they are not without interest.

"Mann is skeptical about the current WearComp fashion:"You can hardly expect that all wearable technologies will find support. The ease with which researchers, keeping their noses in the wind of technological change, switched from smart rooms to smart clothes (always adhering to what might be called a corporate ideology) shows the danger of sweeping assumptions about the benefits of wearable technology. It is quite possible that many wearable systems, alas, will lead us in the other direction - away from personal freedom" [61]. Mann warns against WearComp, sold as a privately licensed device, which now appears as a "double agent" for another institution or enterprise that wants to control or influence people [62]. Here's a technical question with notable political implications: Who manages the information that goes into WearComp and from there to smart devices around the world?

"Surrounding the urban area in an age of mobile and ubiquitous technology, I notice the sprawling networks of personal and public devices, beacons, kiosks, electronic devices, location-based information sources and bulletin boards, load sensors and forwarding services - systems spanning the city, some of which were created according to plan (from above), others grew spontaneously (from below). Cities are the focus of dense information flows, networks and communication channels with a huge amount of information exchange. Digital city advocates are trying to understand the dynamics of all-computer cities populated by mobile communicators in order to deliberately guide architectural design, creating structures that provide security and convenience along with communication.

Review. "Smart crowd: a new social revolution"

Original title: Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution Author: Howard Reingold Publisher: FAIR-PRESS Release year: 2006 Hardcover: hard copy ISBN: 5-8183-1004-3, 0-7382-0861-2 Number of pages: 416 Circulation: 2000 copies. Format: 60x90/16

To be honest, the presence on the cover of such words as smartmob, flashmob, for a long time made me look at other publications and skip this particular book. The release of the book on the wave of popularity of all kinds of mobs made one doubt its interestingness. One evening at a European airport, there was no other choice but to purchase this book, since other options were even less preferable. It's nice to be wrong in the original premises, the book is extremely interesting and written with a very deep approach to the subject, it analyzes many social aspects that arise during the popularization of mobile communications. Already in Moscow I found a Russian-language edition, and the review was written on the basis of this version of the book.

The summary of the book doesn't look very interesting:

“Mobile communications and ubiquitous computerization are already beginning to change the ways of communication, labor and creative activity, trade, and management. Information technology and its manifold impact on various areas of society - this is the theme of the book, brought to the attention of numerous studies, observations and interviews, the main places of the population of the Earth will be flooded with microcircuits capable of communicating with each other. People equipped with such devices will form "intelligent crowds", and their communication will take on forms and possibilities never seen before.

The original edition of the book was published in 2002, and a Russian translation appeared 4 years later. So much has changed in the mobile communication market in 5 years that it would seem that such work, work, is already hopelessly outdated. However, the book focuses on social change, omits technical details or looks at them in terms of their impact on society and consumer behavior. The book is not outdated, it will remain relevant for a long time, and it is worth reading at least once. Without knowing the history and background of most of the changes taking place in the market, one cannot think about the present and the future. Moreover, not only those who are responsible for the development of services, networks, but also for the creation of devices can show interest in the book. This work is comprehensive, covering all areas of knowledge about mobile networks.

Think about the reputation aspect of building services on mobile networks? How is the reputation of the user related to the capability of the services themselves, what examples are there today? Banal questions cause a whole wave of reflection, and examples are by no means in the field of knowledge that most players in the market today turn to.

Let me quote from the book: “Whether the manufacturers of penny chips, wearable computers, handheld geocoded devices, location-based services, smart spaces, digital cities, or intelligent furniture, one thing is clear: in the next decade there will be many inanimate objects connected to the Internet and people connected through mobile technologies of group networks. Citizens' ability to use smart crowd information environments to create profitable adhocracies—the ability to solve social dilemmas—depends less on computing power or bandwidth than on trust and willingness to take risks. This is where reputation can say its weighty word.

Surprisingly, this paragraph includes an answer to the age-old question of many content providers: what kind of services to create so that they are popular in the market? The answer lies in the field of sociology, and not in the technical aspect. It is necessary to rely on users and offer them a qualitative improvement in life, give them a certain risk and cost, but also reward them for it. Do many people consider business in terms of not financial, but social risks? There are only a few such people in the whole world and they are extremely successful. The book also allows you to get ideas in which areas of knowledge you can look for the next breakthrough for mobile technologies.

There are many references to various studies in the book, which makes the narrative by no means a private expression of the author's thoughts, gives a different view of events, theories, and perspectives. For example, here is one such reference to the report of the RAND company, which has established itself as the main developer of game theory and experimental economics.

To quote: "Network warfare is a new kind of confrontation where heroes - from terrorists and criminal gangs on the side of evil to militant public figures on the side of good - use networked forms of organization, doctrines, strategies and technologies, taking into account the requirements of the Nike information age Air Max Shoes in Kenya. The practice of network warfare has far outstripped theory due to the increasing involvement of civilized and barbaric performers in this new kind of confrontation within society.

Here is an excerpt: “Network warfare is a new kind of confrontation, where heroes - from terrorists and criminal gangs from the side of evil to militant public figures from the side of good - use network forms of organization, doctrines, strategies and technologies, taking into account the requirements of the information age Nike Air Max Shoes in Kenya Nike Air Max Shoes in Kenya . The practice of network warfare has far outstripped theory due to the increasing involvement of civilized and barbaric performers in this new kind of confrontation within society.

From the 'Battle of Seattle' to the 'Attack on America', these networks show how difficult they are to deal with; some come out victorious. They all operate in small, dispersed formations, quickly deployed anywhere, anytime. All characteristic network forms of organization, doctrines, strategies and technologies have adapted to the information age. They know how to swarm and disperse, infiltrate and destroy, as well as elude and evade. The activities they engage in are vast, from ideological battles to sabotage, and many of them involve the Internet.”

I will not bombard you with my thoughts, but as a starter I will cite a number of statements from the book, they are not without interest.

"Mann is skeptical about the current WearComp fashion:"You can hardly expect that all wearable technologies will find support. The ease with which researchers, keeping their noses in the wind of technological change, switched from smart rooms to smart clothes (always adhering to what might be called a corporate ideology) shows the danger of sweeping assumptions about the benefits of wearable technology. It is quite possible that many wearable systems, alas, will lead us in the other direction - away from personal freedom" [61]. Mann warns against WearComp, sold as a privately licensed device, which now appears as a "double agent" for another institution or enterprise that wants to control or influence people [62]. Here's a technical question with notable political implications: Who manages the information that goes into WearComp and from there to smart devices around the world?

"Surrounding the urban area in an age of mobile and ubiquitous technology, I notice the sprawling networks of personal and public devices, beacons, kiosks, electronic devices, location-based information sources and bulletin boards, load sensors and forwarding services - systems spanning the city, some of which were created according to plan (from above), others grew spontaneously (from below). Cities are the focus of dense information flows, networks and communication channels with a huge amount of information exchange. Digital city proponents are trying to understand the dynamics of all-computer cities populated by mobile communicators in order to deliberately guide architectural design, creating structures that provide security and convenience along with communication.