Processors in smartphones: the loudest fails

The Exynos 2200 chipset that will power the Samsung Galaxy S22 series is currently on the radar of the entire industry, and there is no certainty about it yet, but users who are picky about the characteristics of the chips are not the first to suffer premonitions. This is especially true of the age-old speculation around Samsung's choice of its own Exynos or Qualcomm's solution for its flagships, which leans one way or the other every few years.

Chipset development is a complex business in general, and it has had its ups and downs in its history. In this article, we recall the loudest failures among smartphone chipsets, and at the same time the devices that they broke the life of.

Snapdragon 810 - "stove" from Qualcomm

Probably the most problematic chipset in recent years is Qualcomm's 2015 "hot hit" called the Snapdragon 810. Its younger brother, the Snapdragon 808, also badly damaged the company's reputation.

Even before this chip was on the market, there were rumors about its overheating problems. And LG G Flex 2, the first smartphone based on this chipset, lived up to them, demonstrating throttling due to overheating, and ended up in benchmarks behind devices based on previous generation chipsets. And the more devices came out, the more widespread fears about chipset problems were confirmed. Of the high-profile announcements of the same year, the HTC M9 and Xiaomi Mi Note Pro turned out to be the same “hot stuff”.

It is worth noting that Samsung did not use Qualcomm solutions in the Galaxy S6 that year, preferring its own Exynos 7420. It was reported that the same overheating was the cause, but neither party confirmed this. The following year, Samsung returned to using Qualcomm's 800-series chipsets. You can draw your own conclusions.

Curiously, Qualcomm's 2015 range also included a less powerful six-core Snapdragon 808. For the company's 800 series, this was a new approach that we have not seen since. This chipset contained two fewer "large" processor cores and fewer graphics cores than the Snapdragon 810. After the complete failure of the LG G Flex 2, LG chose the Snapdragon 808 for that year's flagship LG G4. Even though the 808 ran differently than the 810, all sorts of tech enthusiasts complained about slower performance and still whined about overheating. It turned out to be a losing situation for LG from all sides.

Reality and prospects of the IT professions market

What professions are the most popular and highly paid?

Review of the smartphone Samsung Galaxy A22s 5G (SM A226B/DSN)

A niche smartphone with 5G support for minimal money - it's not even on the Samsung website, but it's sold in Russia. Compare with Galaxy A22 - is it worth the money?

Kia Picanto test. The last of the city cars

Somehow imperceptibly, almost all compact city cars left Russia, which replaced compact class sedans and liftbacks like Hyundai Solaris and Skoda Rapid. There are always two real city cars left on our market, this is the hero of our material Kia Picanto and Chevrolet Spark, along with its counterpart under the Ravon brand.

TCL TW30 MoveAudio S600 TWS headphones review

Any decent smartphone manufacturer is bound to offer their own TWS headset with them. So TCL introduced in December on the Russian market not only a flagship smartphone, but also a flagship headset. Let's see what happened ...

Intel didn't even try to move to 4G

Intel's place on the list of fails is not because of screwed up products, but because of how little impact it has had on the smartphone market. However, it cannot be said that she did not try at all. In September 2011, Intel and Google collaborated to bring Android support to Intel processors, resulting in the Intel Atom chipsets designed for smartphones in the Medfield, Clover Trail, and Moorefield architectures.

The first two Intel-based Android smartphones were the Lenovo K800 and the Motorola RAZR, released in 2012. But the widest scope for the early Atom line was tablets. None of these devices fired. And Asus has become the biggest supporter of mobile chipsets from Intel. In 2014, the Zenfone series was released on dual-core Intel Atom processors. The company then used quad-core Atom chipsets in the 2015 Zenfone 2 and Zenfone Zoom smartphones. But things didn’t go any further - Asus switched to solutions from MediaTek and Qualcomm, like the rest of the industry.

To tell you the truth, Asus and Intel's partnership has resulted in devices with pretty decent performance for the price. But, unfortunately, they lacked the processor and graphics capabilities that the flagships of the time had.

Intel's Atom ambitions are further developed with the SoFIA lineup based on the Silvermont CPU and Arm Mali GPU. However, Intel lagged far behind in modem development, and Wi-Fi-only solutions did not attract buyers. Despite the fact that 3G and 4G chipsets were announced, the launch dates under the SoFIA project were constantly postponed. Intel buried the entire project in 2016 and exited the smartphone market with little impact. However, something from Intel's heritage in terms of developing processors for smartphones continued to live in budget chips from Unisoc.

Mediatek - ten-core games

Speaking of chipsets that never made it into the hands of buyers, does anyone remember the MediaTek Helio X20 and X30? In 2017, the Helio X20 arrived and was ahead of its time - it was the first tri-cluster CPU chipset currently found in top Android mobile chipsets.

Despite the new three-cluster design and 10 CPU cores, the Helio X20 and its successors lacked performance. With just two large cores and eight low power cores, four of which were clocked at low speeds, it was no match for the performance of competitors' flagship processors. Although X20 was not suitable for flagships, it has found its way into budget devices from Doogie, Elephone, LeEco, Sharp, Xiaomi and others.

Mediatek developed this idea in 2017 with the Helio X30, which featured a new PowerVR GPU and Tensilica DSP designed to compete with the best on the market. However, the lack of performance scared off customers, and the only company that bought its X30 from Mediatek was Meizu. The 10-core Helio X line was apparently so unprofitable that Mediatek abandoned its flagship processor ambitions for years and only recently returned with the powerful Dimensity 9000.

Security issues in Exynos

And here is another epic fail. Samsung's Exynos 4210 and 4412 were the victims of a root exploit that turned out to be so "simple" that it was built into a one-click app.

In case you're not familiar with the concept of root access, it grants a user or malicious application access to all low-level Android OS files, allowing them to install applications and access sensitive files at will. Intentionally rooting a phone was a craze back in 2012 as it allowed the use of advanced apps as well as switching between multiple ROMs on the same phone, so this security hole was a boon for some users. But it was also a significant threat to everyone else, especially if malware used the exploit.

Processors in smartphones: the loudest fails

The Exynos 2200 chipset that will power the Samsung Galaxy S22 series is currently on the radar of the entire industry, and there is no certainty about it yet, but users who are picky about the characteristics of the chips are not the first to suffer premonitions. This is especially true of the age-old speculation around Samsung's choice of its own Exynos or Qualcomm's solution for its flagships, which leans one way or the other every few years.

Chipset development is a complex business in general, and it has had its ups and downs in its history. In this article, we recall the loudest failures among smartphone chipsets, and at the same time the devices that they broke the life of.

Snapdragon 810 - "stove" from Qualcomm

Probably the most problematic chipset in recent years is Qualcomm's 2015 "hot hit" called the Snapdragon 810. Its younger brother, the Snapdragon 808, also badly damaged the company's reputation.

Even before this chip was on the market, there were rumors about its overheating problems. And LG G Flex 2, the first smartphone based on this chipset, lived up to them, demonstrating throttling due to overheating, and ended up in benchmarks behind devices based on previous generation chipsets. And the more devices came out, the more widespread fears about chipset problems were confirmed. Of the high-profile announcements of the same year, the HTC M9 and Xiaomi Mi Note Pro turned out to be the same “hot stuff”.

It is worth noting that Samsung did not use Qualcomm solutions in the Galaxy S6 that year, preferring its own Exynos 7420. It was reported that the same overheating was the cause, but neither party confirmed this. The following year, Samsung returned to using Qualcomm's 800-series chipsets. You can draw your own conclusions.

Curiously, Qualcomm's 2015 range also included a less powerful six-core Snapdragon 808. For the company's 800 series, this was a new approach that we have not seen since. This chipset contained two fewer "large" processor cores and fewer graphics cores than the Snapdragon 810. After the complete failure of the LG G Flex 2, LG chose the Snapdragon 808 for that year's flagship LG G4. Even though the 808 ran differently than the 810, all sorts of tech enthusiasts complained about slower performance and still whined about overheating. It turned out to be a losing situation for LG from all sides.

Reality and prospects of the IT professions market

What professions are the most popular and highly paid?

Review of the smartphone Samsung Galaxy A22s 5G (SM A226B/DSN)

A niche smartphone with 5G support for minimal money - it's not even on the Samsung website, but it's sold in Russia. Compare with Galaxy A22 - is it worth the money?

Kia Picanto test. The last of the city cars

Somehow imperceptibly, almost all compact city cars left Russia, which replaced compact class sedans and liftbacks like Hyundai Solaris and Skoda Rapid. There are always two real city cars left on our market, this is the hero of our material Kia Picanto and Chevrolet Spark, along with its counterpart under the Ravon brand.

TCL TW30 MoveAudio S600 TWS headphones review

Any decent smartphone manufacturer is bound to offer their own TWS headset with them. So TCL introduced in December on the Russian market not only a flagship smartphone, but also a flagship headset. Let's see what happened ...

Intel didn't even try to move to 4G

Intel's place on the list of fails is not because of screwed up products, but because of how little impact it has had on the smartphone market. However, it cannot be said that she did not try at all. In September 2011, Intel and Google collaborated to bring Android support to Intel processors, resulting in the Intel Atom chipsets designed for smartphones in the Medfield, Clover Trail, and Moorefield architectures.

The first two Intel-based Android smartphones were the Lenovo K800 and the Motorola RAZR, released in 2012. But the widest scope for the early Atom line was tablets. None of these devices fired. And Asus has become the biggest supporter of mobile chipsets from Intel. In 2014, the Zenfone series was released on dual-core Intel Atom processors. The company then used quad-core Atom chipsets in the 2015 Zenfone 2 and Zenfone Zoom smartphones. But things didn’t go any further - Asus switched to solutions from MediaTek and Qualcomm, like the rest of the industry.

To tell you the truth, Asus and Intel's partnership has resulted in devices with pretty decent performance for the price. But, unfortunately, they lacked the processor and graphics capabilities that the flagships of the time had.

Intel's Atom ambitions are further developed with the SoFIA lineup based on the Silvermont CPU and Arm Mali GPU. However, Intel lagged far behind in modem development, and Wi-Fi-only solutions did not attract buyers. Despite the fact that 3G and 4G chipsets were announced, the launch dates under the SoFIA project were constantly postponed. Intel buried the entire project in 2016 and exited the smartphone market with little impact. However, something from Intel's heritage in terms of developing processors for smartphones continued to live in budget chips from Unisoc.

Mediatek - ten-core games

Speaking of chipsets that never made it into the hands of buyers, does anyone remember the MediaTek Helio X20 and X30? In 2017, the Helio X20 arrived and was ahead of its time - it was the first tri-cluster CPU chipset currently found in top Android mobile chipsets.

Despite the new three-cluster design and 10 CPU cores, the Helio X20 and its successors lacked performance. With just two large cores and eight low power cores, four of which were clocked at low speeds, it was no match for the performance of competitors' flagship processors. Although X20 was not suitable for flagships, it has found its way into budget devices from Doogie, Elephone, LeEco, Sharp, Xiaomi and others.

Processors in smartphones: the loudest fails

The Exynos 2200 chipset that will power the Samsung Galaxy S22 series is currently on the radar of the entire industry, and there is no certainty about it yet, but users who are picky about the characteristics of the chips are not the first to suffer premonitions. This is especially true of the age-old speculation around Samsung's choice of its own Exynos or Qualcomm's solution for its flagships, which leans one way or the other every few years.

Chipset development is a complex business in general, and it has had its ups and downs in its history. In this article, we recall the loudest failures among smartphone chipsets, and at the same time the devices that they broke the life of.

Snapdragon 810 - "stove" from Qualcomm

Probably the most problematic chipset in recent years is Qualcomm's 2015 "hot hit" called the Snapdragon 810. Its younger brother, the Snapdragon 808, also badly damaged the company's reputation.

Reality and prospects of the IT professions market

What professions are the most popular and highly paid?

Review of the smartphone Samsung Galaxy A22s 5G (SM A226B/DSN)

A niche smartphone with 5G support for minimal money - it's not even on the Samsung website, but it's sold in Russia. Compare with Galaxy A22 - is it worth the money?

Kia Picanto test. The last of the city cars

Somehow imperceptibly, almost all compact city cars left Russia, which replaced compact class sedans and liftbacks like Hyundai Solaris and Skoda Rapid. There are always two real city cars left on our market, this is the hero of our material Kia Picanto and Chevrolet Spark, along with its counterpart under the Ravon brand.

TCL TW30 MoveAudio S600 TWS headphones review

Any decent smartphone manufacturer is bound to offer their own TWS headset with them. So TCL introduced in December on the Russian market not only a flagship smartphone, but also a flagship headset. Let's see what happened ...

Intel didn't even try to move to 4G

Intel's place on the list of fails is not because of screwed up products, but because of how little impact it has had on the smartphone market. However, it cannot be said that she did not try at all. In September 2011, Intel and Google collaborated to bring Android support to Intel processors, resulting in the Intel Atom chipsets designed for smartphones in the Medfield, Clover Trail, and Moorefield architectures.

The first two Intel-based Android smartphones were the Lenovo K800 and the Motorola RAZR, released in 2012. But the widest scope for the early Atom line was tablets. None of these devices fired. And Asus has become the biggest supporter of mobile chipsets from Intel. In 2014, the Zenfone series was released on dual-core Intel Atom processors. The company then used quad-core Atom chipsets in the 2015 Zenfone 2 and Zenfone Zoom smartphones. But things didn’t go any further - Asus switched to solutions from MediaTek and Qualcomm, like the rest of the industry.

To tell you the truth, Asus and Intel's partnership has resulted in devices with pretty decent performance for the price. But, unfortunately, they lacked the processor and graphics capabilities that the flagships of the time had.

Intel's Atom ambitions are further developed with the SoFIA lineup based on the Silvermont CPU and Arm Mali GPU. However, Intel lagged far behind in modem development, and Wi-Fi-only solutions did not attract buyers. Despite the fact that 3G and 4G chipsets were announced, the launch dates under the SoFIA project were constantly postponed. Intel buried the entire project in 2016 and exited the smartphone market with little impact. However, something from Intel's heritage in terms of developing processors for smartphones continued to live in budget chips from Unisoc.

Mediatek - ten-core games

Speaking of chipsets that never made it into the hands of buyers, does anyone remember the MediaTek Helio X20 and X30? In 2017, the Helio X20 arrived and was ahead of its time - it was the first tri-cluster CPU chipset currently found in top Android mobile chipsets.

Despite the new three-cluster design and 10 CPU cores, the Helio X20 and its successors lacked performance. With just two large cores and eight low power cores, four of which were clocked at low speeds, it was no match for the performance of competitors' flagship processors. Although X20 was not suitable for flagships, it has found its way into budget devices from Doogie, Elephone, LeEco, Sharp, Xiaomi and others.

Mediatek developed this idea in 2017 with the Helio X30, which featured a new PowerVR GPU and Tensilica DSP designed to compete with the best on the market. However, the lack of performance scared off customers, and the only company that bought its X30 from Mediatek was Meizu. The 10-core Helio X line was apparently so unprofitable that Mediatek abandoned its flagship processor ambitions for years and only recently returned with the powerful Dimensity 9000.

Security issues in Exynos

And here is another epic fail. Samsung's Exynos 4210 and 4412 were the victims of a root exploit that turned out to be so "simple" that it was built into a one-click app.

In case you're not familiar with the concept of root access, it grants a user or malicious application access to all low-level Android OS files, allowing them to install applications and access sensitive files at will. Intentionally rooting a phone was a craze back in 2012 as it allowed the use of advanced apps as well as switching between multiple ROMs on the same phone, so this security hole was a boon for some users. But it was also a significant threat to everyone else, especially if malware used the exploit.

Processors in smartphones: the loudest fails

The Exynos 2200 chipset that will power the Samsung Galaxy S22 series is currently on the radar of the entire industry, and there is no certainty about it yet, but users who are picky about the characteristics of the chips are not the first to suffer premonitions. This is especially true of the age-old speculation around Samsung's choice of its own Exynos or Qualcomm's solution for its flagships, which leans one way or the other every few years.

Chipset development is a complex business in general, and it has had its ups and downs in its history. In this article, we recall the loudest failures among smartphone chipsets, and at the same time the devices that they broke the life of.

Snapdragon 810 - "stove" from Qualcomm

Probably the most problematic chipset in recent years is Qualcomm's 2015 "hot hit" called the Snapdragon 810. Its younger brother, the Snapdragon 808, also badly damaged the company's reputation.

Even before this chip was on the market, there were rumors about its overheating problems. And LG G Flex 2, the first smartphone based on this chipset, justified them, demonstrating throttling due to overheating, and ended up in benchmarks behind devices based on previous generation chipsets. And the more devices came out, the more widespread fears about chipset problems were confirmed. Of the high-profile announcements of the same year, the HTC M9 and Xiaomi Mi Note Pro turned out to be the same “hot stuff”.

Even before this chip hit the market, there were rumors about his problems with overheating. And LG G Flex 2, the first smartphone based on this chipset, justified them, demonstrating throttling due to overheating, and ended up in benchmarks behind devices based on previous generation chipsets. And the more devices came out, the more widespread fears about chipset problems were confirmed. Of the high-profile announcements of the same year, the HTC M9 and Xiaomi Mi Note Pro turned out to be the same “hot stuff”.

It is worth noting that Samsung did not use Qualcomm solutions in the Galaxy S6 that year, preferring its own Exynos 7420. It was reported that the same overheating was the cause, but neither party confirmed this. The following year, Samsung returned to using Qualcomm's 800-series chipsets. You can draw your own conclusions.

Curiously, Qualcomm's 2015 range also included a less powerful six-core Snapdragon 808. For the company's 800 series, this was a new approach that we have not seen since. This chipset contained two fewer "large" processor cores and fewer graphics cores than the Snapdragon 810. After the complete failure of the LG G Flex 2, LG chose the Snapdragon 808 for that year's flagship LG G4. Even though the 808 ran differently than the 810, all sorts of tech enthusiasts complained about slower performance and still whined about overheating. It turned out to be a losing situation for LG from all sides.

Reality and prospects of the IT professions market

What professions are the most popular and highly paid?

Review of the smartphone Samsung Galaxy A22s 5G (SM A226B/DSN)

A niche smartphone with 5G support for minimal money - it's not even on the Samsung website, but it's sold in Russia. Compare with Galaxy A22 - is it worth the money?

Kia Picanto test. The last of the city cars

Somehow imperceptibly, almost all compact city cars left Russia, which replaced compact class sedans and liftbacks like Hyundai Solaris and Skoda Rapid. There are always two real city cars left on our market, this is the hero of our material Kia Picanto and Chevrolet Spark, along with its counterpart under the Ravon brand.

TCL TW30 MoveAudio S600 TWS headphones review

Any decent smartphone manufacturer is bound to offer their own TWS headset with them. So TCL introduced in December on the Russian market not only a flagship smartphone, but also a flagship headset. Let's see what happened ...

Intel didn't even try to move to 4G

Intel's place on the list of fails is not because of screwed up products, but because of how little impact it has had on the smartphone market. However, it cannot be said that she did not try at all. In September 2011, Intel and Google collaborated to bring Android support to Intel processors, resulting in the Intel Atom chipsets designed for smartphones in the Medfield, Clover Trail, and Moorefield architectures.

The first two Intel-based Android smartphones were the Lenovo K800 and the Motorola RAZR, released in 2012. But the widest scope for the early Atom line was tablets. None of these devices fired. And Asus has become the biggest supporter of mobile chipsets from Intel. In 2014, the Zenfone series was released on dual-core Intel Atom processors. The company then used quad-core Atom chipsets in the 2015 Zenfone 2 and Zenfone Zoom smartphones. But things didn’t go any further - Asus switched to solutions from MediaTek and Qualcomm, like the rest of the industry.

To tell you the truth, Asus and Intel's partnership has resulted in devices with pretty decent performance for the price. But, unfortunately, they lacked the processor and graphics capabilities that the flagships of the time had.

Intel's Atom ambitions are further developed with the SoFIA lineup based on the Silvermont CPU and Arm Mali GPU. However, Intel lagged far behind in modem development, and Wi-Fi-only solutions did not attract buyers. Despite the fact that 3G and 4G chipsets were announced, the launch dates under the SoFIA project were constantly postponed. Intel buried the entire project in 2016 and exited the smartphone market with little impact. However, something from Intel's heritage in terms of developing processors for smartphones continued to live in budget chips from Unisoc.

Mediatek - ten-core games

Speaking of chipsets that never made it into the hands of buyers, does anyone remember the MediaTek Helio X20 and X30? In 2017, the Helio X20 arrived and was ahead of its time - it was the first tri-cluster CPU chipset currently found in top Android mobile chipsets.

Despite the new three-cluster design and 10 CPU cores, the Helio X20 and its successors lacked performance. With just two large cores and eight low power cores, four of which were clocked at low speeds, it was no match for the performance of competitors' flagship processors. Although X20 was not suitable for flagships, it has found its way into budget devices from Doogie, Elephone, LeEco, Sharp, Xiaomi and others.

Mediatek developed this idea in 2017 with the Helio X30, which featured a new PowerVR GPU and Tensilica DSP designed to compete with the best on the market. However, the lack of performance scared off customers, and the only company that bought its X30 from Mediatek was Meizu. The 10-core Helio X line was apparently so unprofitable that Mediatek abandoned its flagship ambitions in processors for years and only recently returned with the powerful Dimensity 9000.

Security issues in Exynos

And here is another epic fail. Samsung's Exynos 4210 and 4412 were the victims of a root exploit that turned out to be so "simple" that it was built into a one-click app.

In case you're not familiar with the concept of root access, it grants a user or malicious application access to all low-level Android OS files, allowing them to install applications and access sensitive files at will. Intentionally rooting a phone was a craze back in 2012 as it allowed the use of advanced apps as well as switching between multiple ROMs on the same phone, so this security hole was a boon for some users. But it was also a significant threat to everyone else, especially if malware used the exploit.