Japan. Tokyo in detail

In the first part of a series of articles about Japan, I told you about the organization of the trip, the cost of plane tickets, transportation, hotel accommodation, and other features of the preparatory stage. Part 2 was about Kyoto and Japanese bullet trains, and now it's time to talk about my favorite place in Japan, Tokyo.

Everyone who has been abroad probably has a city that you want to return to again and again, which attracts. For me, that city is Tokyo. The strange thing is that in Tokyo, I personally feel very calm and relaxed, and this despite the fact that the capital of Japan, with more than 13 million inhabitants according to official data for 2010 alone, is distinguished by an incredible building density and a very dynamic rhythm of life, which is very easy to see , barely being in the morning train to the center or in the subway.

Before moving on to the story of Tokyo in pictures, and there I will try to add a minimum of text and a maximum of photos, I will give a brief information about the city. Tokyo is the capital of Japan with a population of over 13 million and an area of ​​over 2,000 square kilometers. It is wrong to call Tokyo a city in the usual sense of the word, it is a special administrative district (capital district, prefecture), consisting of many special districts. Tokyo is usually referred to as 23 special districts, and the districts, in turn, are divided into quarters.

It would seem that a reader who is preparing a trip to Tokyo does not need this information, but it is not. The fact is that Tokyo is diverse not only on paper, but also in reality. The city really varies greatly depending on which block and which district you are in at the moment. Moreover, it is better to study Tokyo, having previously at least briefly studied the history of individual special areas. Among them are shopping and business districts, which are distinguished by a large number of skyscrapers, and historical districts that have preserved part of the old buildings. Each special district has its own rich history and personality.

I want to start the story about Tokyo with a small block of information about the Tokyo subway, because the best way to get around the city is by subway and electric trains, and not by taxis, which are often in traffic jams.

Metro and electric trains

If you plan to ride the subway in Tokyo, you need to consider one important point - the city subway serves not one, but several companies, so they have different tickets. Fares vary depending on the number of stations you need to pass. A trip from one station to another will cost an average of 50 rubles, a trip through several stations - 60 rubles and more. Buying tickets is easy - there are ticket machines at each station, they accept coins and, sometimes, bills. Automatic machines, of course, can make you smile or even surprise with their appearance, they are quite a few years old, more than 10 or even 15 by eye, but all the machines work fine, and the Japanese, as I noticed, are generally reluctant to change the old ones, but all still working things, to new ones.

However, another way is more convenient and economical than one-time tickets - buying a universal plastic card, of which there are many in Japan. The most popular are SUICA and PASMO. By purchasing any of them and putting a certain amount on it, you can forget about daily metro tickets and calculating the correct cost of the trip. After all, if you buy the wrong ticket from the machine, for example, you need to pass ten stations, and you buy nine for travel, then when you exit the metro, you will have to go to the machine again and pay extra for the extra station. In a word, plastic in the form of SUICA or PASMO cards is more convenient. The card is replenished upon purchase, and then simply in vending machines, money is debited from it when entering the metro and exiting automatically, you do not need to calculate tariffs and so on. Moreover, these cards are accepted in most shops and cafes in Japan (in large and medium-sized cities - for sure), so you can use the card almost everywhere to pay for all services, food, transportation, museums and purchases in stores. Below are links to sites with information on maps:

At first glance, the Tokyo subway seems very complicated, but in fact it is not. The main thing is to deal with the transfer points, carefully look at the signs and, in fact, that's all. Getting out of the station to the right place is not a problem at all.

Here's what it looks like: at each station there are huge billboards with many signs-numbers, they show the exits to all important places from a particular station. In the center of Tokyo, these are signs to monuments, shops, museums, streets, and more.

Look for a place to which you need to get off, and then follow the number from the sign from the metro - everything is as simple as possible.

In the carriages, all information is duplicated in English, both voice announcements and text on the displays, so you can only miss your station when you fall asleep.

Tokyo in detail

Let's move on to the usual "comment and picture" format, I will try to tell you about all the interesting details and features of the city that I noticed. There will be no order in the further narrative, just a pile of photographs and comments on them. Let's go.

About architecture

The center of Tokyo is very beautiful at any time of the day - it combines old and new architecture, many skyscrapers that are unusual in shape and appearance, and not far from the station there is an imperial palace and a park.

Pay attention to all these Japanese - they saw how beautifully the sunset is reflected in the station building and just stopped to look at it, and many of them to take pictures of the sunset and the building itself. And this is all Japan.

Unusual architecture around Tokyo, how do you like this building?

There are a lot of skyscrapers in Tokyo and almost every one has its own observation deck, access is either free, Alison's Hair Food Wheat Germ Oil or for a nominal fee.

Picture from the series - "find a strange object in the frame."

On the contrary, there are low-rise areas or places that are simply interesting for other architecture, including residential buildings.

By the way, at the beginning I wrote that there are a lot of people in Tokyo, this is especially noticeable on weekends or holidays, if you are somewhere in the center. Here, for example, one of the streets with many shops, cafes and other things, pay attention to the number of people crossing the road:

But let's continue talking about architecture. In the center of Tokyo there are quite unusual buildings, both in form and in the materials used for decoration. No need to say much here, just take a look:

The Tokyo subway is certainly not a rival to the Moscow subway in terms of beauty and monumentality, but some beautiful corners can be found here:

In Japan, sewer manholes are very, very beautifully decorated. Each city has its own design manholes, often even individual districts use their own design. Unfortunately, on this trip I was not able to find a sufficient number of different hatches, but in the next I will try to correct this omission:

A manhole in Yokohama, near Tokyo

Many major stores in Tokyo have left-luggage offices for your belongings. But, unlike the simplest lockers we are used to at stores, in Tokyo these are real roomy lockers with a code and daily payment. If you walk around the city for half a day and are tired of a heavy backpack or, for example, bought all sorts of things, but you don’t want to take them to the hotel, because there are plans to take a walk, you can just go to one of these shops near the metro station from which you you will go to the hotel, and leave things there in the storage room, and continue on your own. This is very convenient when your hotel is far from the center of the city, and going there just to leave some things and go back to the city is a waste of time.

300 yen is about 100 rubles.

About food

There is an opinion that Japan has very strange and peculiar food and that a foreigner will not like "their food". This may be true for some, but even so, Tokyo is friendly to foreigners - it is full of Starbucks and various fast food, as well as local restaurants specializing in European cuisine. But flying to Japan to eat European food is, of course, strange.

The Japanese do eat sushi and sashimi (sushi and sashimi, to be exact). Sushi is a small ball of rice, a pinch of wasabi and some seafood, usually on top of the ball. More often, raw fish is used as seafood, but there are sushi not only with it. The rolls familiar to us are practically absent in Japan, of course, sushi rolls are also found here, but, as a rule, in any cafe or restaurant where sushi is served, you can count two or three types of rolls, everything else is traditional sushi.

What to add here? Even if you are not a fan of raw fish, you should try sushi, it is unusual and not at all like what is in the "Japanese" cafes in Russia.

When ordering sushi, people usually ask about wasabi - the question is not whether to serve wasabi with sushi, but whether to put a lot of wasabi in sushi or not to put at all. Also, sushi bars usually serve a small glass of miso soup and green tea for free.

If you haven't tried udon or ramen, they are worth a try in Tokyo (and indeed in Japan). In short, it's just wheat noodles in broth. Ramen - noodles cooked with egg, udon - without. But in every cafe and in every restaurant, as it turns out, these dishes are completely different and are served in completely different forms with various additives. You can take it just at random, showing a picture from the menu. When the ordered ramen or udon is brought to you, the question may arise how it is. There are two options here - ask the waiter or look around and see how the others are eating.If you are sitting in a small cafe, and especially if you are sitting in some "ramen" or "udon" right opposite the kitchen (bar format), you can just ask your neighbor how to eat (or wait until the neighbor takes pity and helps himself , seeing your futile attempts to figure it out). The Japanese are very, very responsive, if a tourist asks them about something, because a tourist here is equated to a child who does not know anything, so they help tourists accordingly. So feel free to ask, if anything. Even if your neighbor doesn't speak English and you don't speak Japanese, sign language will most likely win!

Here are some shots from a ramen shop located in the basement of one of the buildings somewhere in the city center. Here, a Japanese sitting next to us helped us figure out how to eat.

In many cafes in Tokyo, and in other cities of Japan, stools and chairs are equipped with special pockets for a bag, a very convenient thing, by the way. No need to put the bag on the floor or occupy another chair with it. If you go to a cafe with a large suitcase, you can just give it away at the entrance - nice employees will put the suitcase separately from the table and return it to you at the exit.

And one more thing. In sushi bars and various cafes, especially at train stations and other places where there are a lot of people, there are long queues in the evenings. The main thing here is just to calmly stand in line - they are neat in Japan and stand in them all evenly - and wait. As in China or Korea, it is customary here to transfer a card or money for payment with two hands and receive change and a check. You can also, of course, not do this, but it’s better to do it - this way you will get another smile in response and a drop of positive emotions (vibration, if you are like Seryozha Kuzmin).

About details

You've probably read or at least heard about high-tech toilets in Japan and South Korea. There are a lot of buttons and sometimes even entire control panels for jet operation, heating, and so on, seriously. So - when you find yourself on such a toilet, not figuratively, but in the literal sense, the main thing is not to get confused and study all the controls and key assignments in advance! Because in many hotels the buttons do not translate into English and pressing the wrong key by accident can give you the wrong stream and so on.

There are many shopping centers in Tokyo, different goods are usually divided by floors, that is, men's clothes on one floor, children's clothes on the other, and women's clothes on the rest. There is also a floor with all sorts of little things, accessories and bookstores. On such floors you can often find some cafe with delicious coffee and rolls or Starbucks.

Here's how nicely decorated one of the partitions between the shops at the Central Station in Tokyo:

A fully pumped electric bike.

Amazing, in my opinion, infographic, in a small shopping center in Yokohama.

I don't know what it is. If one of the readers tells me, I will be grateful!

People in the know, when I posted this picture on Instagram, they said that this is a very rare car.

The time is about 21-22 hours, a bookstore, and in the photo you see a shop window located right on the street. No locks, chains, glass or anything else - you can get up, take and look at any book from the window.

About MUJI

There is an unusual chain of stores in Japan - MUJI. Their unusualness lies in the fact that all goods in MUJI are not branded, that is, at all - there are not even tags with the name "MUJI" on things, and the essence of this network is selling high-quality and relatively inexpensive at the same time noname-things under one brand, mainly from China.

The range of things in MUJI is very large - everything is sold here from clothes, socks and shoes to cosmetics, food, furniture and various small household items like compact plastic boxes for small things, stink lamps and other things.

Картинка для привлечения внимания – вид на Йокогаму сверху. В следующей статье немного про Йокогаму, Хаконе и Химедзи. До встречи!

Япония. Токио в деталях

В первой части серии статей о Японии я рассказал вам про организацию поездки, стоимость билетов на самолет, транспорт, проживание в отелях, а также про другие особенности подготовительного этапа. Во второй части речь шла о Киото и японских скоростных поездах, а теперь настало время поговорить о моем любимом месте в Японии – Токио.

Everyone who has been abroad probably has a city that you want to return to again and again, which attracts. For me, that city is Tokyo. The strange thing is that in Tokyo, I personally feel very calm and relaxed, and this despite the fact that the capital of Japan, with more than 13 million inhabitants according to official data for 2010 alone, is distinguished by an incredible building density and a very dynamic rhythm of life, which is very easy to see , barely being in the morning train to the center or in the subway.

Before moving on to the story of Tokyo in pictures, and there I will try to add a minimum of text and a maximum of photos, I will give a brief information about the city. Tokyo is the capital of Japan with a population of over 13 million and an area of ​​over 2,000 square kilometers. It is wrong to call Tokyo a city in the usual sense of the word, it is a special administrative district (capital district, prefecture), consisting of many special districts. Tokyo is usually referred to as 23 special districts, and the districts, in turn, are divided into quarters.

It would seem that a reader who is preparing a trip to Tokyo does not need this information, but it is not. The fact is that Tokyo is diverse not only on paper, but also in reality. The city really varies greatly depending on which block and which district you are in at the moment. Moreover, it is better to study Tokyo, having previously at least briefly studied the history of individual special areas. Among them are shopping and business districts, which are distinguished by a large number of skyscrapers, and historical districts that have preserved part of the old buildings. Each special district has its own rich history and personality.

I want to start the story about Tokyo with a small block of information about the Tokyo subway, because the best way to get around the city is by subway and electric trains, and not by taxis, which are often in traffic jams.

Metro and electric trains

If you plan to ride the subway in Tokyo, you need to consider one important point - the city subway serves not one, but several companies, so they have different tickets. Fares vary depending on the number of stations you need to pass. A trip from one station to another will cost an average of 50 rubles, a trip through several stations - 60 rubles and more. Buying tickets is easy - there are ticket machines at each station, they accept coins and, sometimes, bills. Automatic machines, of course, can make you smile or even surprise with their appearance, they are quite a few years old, more than 10 or even 15 by eye, but all the machines work fine, and the Japanese, as I noticed, are generally reluctant to change the old ones, but all still working things, to new ones.

However, another way is more convenient and economical than one-time tickets - buying a universal plastic card, of which there are many in Japan. The most popular are SUICA and PASMO. By purchasing any of them and putting a certain amount on it, you can forget about daily metro tickets and calculating the correct cost of the trip. After all, if you buy the wrong ticket from the machine, for example, you need to pass ten stations, and you buy nine for travel, then when you exit the metro, you will have to go to the machine again and pay extra for the extra station. In a word, plastic in the form of SUICA or PASMO cards is more convenient. The card is replenished upon purchase, and then simply in vending machines, money is debited from it when entering the metro and exiting automatically, you do not need to calculate tariffs and so on. Moreover, these cards are accepted in most stores and cafes in Japan (in large and medium-sized cities - for sure), so you can use the card almost everywhere to pay for all services, food, transportation, museums and purchases in stores. Below are links to sites with information on maps:

At first glance, the Tokyo subway seems very complicated, but in fact it is not. The main thing is to deal with the transfer points, carefully look at the signs and, in fact, that's all. Getting out of the station to the right place is not a problem at all.

Here's what it looks like: at each station there are huge billboards with many signs-numbers, they show the exits to all important places from a particular station. In the center of Tokyo, these are signs to monuments, shops, museums, streets, and more.

Look for a place to which you need to get off, and then follow the number from the sign from the metro - everything is as simple as possible.

In the carriages, all information is duplicated in English, both voice announcements and text on the displays, so you can only miss your station when you fall asleep.

Tokyo in detail

Let's move on to the usual "comment and picture" format, I will try to tell you about all the interesting details and features of the city that I noticed. There will be no order in the further narrative, just a pile of photographs and comments on them. Let's go.

About architecture

The center of Tokyo is very beautiful at any time of the day - it combines old and new architecture, many skyscrapers that are unusual in shape and appearance, and not far from the station there is an imperial palace and a park.

Pay attention to all these Japanese - they saw how beautifully the sunset is reflected in the station building and just stopped to look at it, and many of them to take pictures of the sunset and the building itself. And this is all Japan.

Unusual architecture around Tokyo, how do you like this building?

There are a lot of skyscrapers in Tokyo and almost every one has its own observation deck, access is either free, Alison's Hair Food Wheat Germ Oil or for a nominal fee.

Picture from the series - "find a strange object in the frame."

On the contrary, there are low-rise areas or places that are simply interesting for other architecture, including residential buildings.

By the way, at the beginning I wrote that there are a lot of people in Tokyo, this is especially noticeable on weekends or holidays, if you are somewhere in the center. Here, for example, one of the streets with many shops, cafes and other things, pay attention to the number of people crossing the road:

But let's continue talking about architecture. In the center of Tokyo there are quite unusual buildings, both in form and in the materials used for decoration. No need to say much here, just take a look:

The Tokyo subway is certainly not a rival to the Moscow subway in terms of beauty and monumentality, but some beautiful corners can be found here:

In Japan, sewer manholes are very, very beautifully decorated. Each city has its own design manholes, often even individual districts use their own design. Unfortunately, on this trip I was not able to find a sufficient number of different hatches, but in the next I will try to correct this omission:

A manhole in Yokohama, near Tokyo

Many major stores in Tokyo have left-luggage offices for your belongings. But, unlike the simplest lockers we are used to at stores, in Tokyo these are real roomy lockers with a code and daily payment. If you walk around the city for half a day and are tired of a heavy backpack or, for example, bought all sorts of things, but you don’t want to take them to the hotel, because there are plans to take a walk, you can just go to one of these shops near the metro station from which you you will go to the hotel, and leave things there in the storage room, and continue on your own. This is very convenient when your hotel is far from the center of the city, and going there just to leave some things and go back to the city is a waste of time.

When ordering sushi, people usually ask about wasabi - the question is not whether to serve wasabi with sushi, but whether to put a lot of wasabi in sushi or not to put at all. Also, sushi bars usually serve a small glass of miso soup and green tea for free.

If you haven't tried udon or ramen, they are worth a try in Tokyo (and indeed in Japan). In short, it's just wheat noodles in broth. Ramen - noodles cooked with egg, udon - without. But in every cafe and in every restaurant, as it turns out, these dishes are completely different and are served in completely different forms with various additives. You can take it just at random, showing a picture from the menu. When the ordered ramen or udon is brought to you, the question may arise how it is. There are two options here - ask the waiter or look around and see how the others are eating.If you are sitting in a small cafe, and especially if you are sitting in some "ramen" or "udon" right opposite the kitchen (bar format), you can just ask your neighbor how to eat (or wait until the neighbor takes pity and helps himself , seeing your futile attempts to figure it out). The Japanese are very, very responsive, if a tourist asks them about something, because a tourist here is equated to a child who does not know anything, so they help tourists accordingly. So feel free to ask, if anything. Even if your neighbor doesn't speak English and you don't speak Japanese, sign language will most likely win!

Here are some shots from a ramen shop located in the basement of one of the buildings somewhere in the city center. Here, a Japanese sitting next to us helped us figure out how to eat.

In many cafes in Tokyo, and in other cities of Japan, stools and chairs are equipped with special pockets for a bag, a very convenient thing, by the way. No need to put the bag on the floor or occupy another chair with it. If you go to a cafe with a large suitcase, you can just give it away at the entrance - nice employees will put the suitcase separately from the table and return it to you at the exit.

And one more thing. In sushi bars and various cafes, especially at train stations and other places where there are a lot of people, there are long queues in the evenings. The main thing here is just to calmly stand in line - they are neat in Japan and stand in them all evenly - and wait. As in China or Korea, it is customary here to transfer a card or money for payment with two hands and receive change and a check. You can also, of course, not do this, but it’s better to do it - this way you will get another smile in response and a drop of positive emotions (vibration, if you are like Seryozha Kuzmin).

About details

You've probably read or at least heard about high-tech toilets in Japan and South Korea. There are a lot of buttons and sometimes even entire control panels for jet operation, heating, and so on, seriously. So - when you find yourself on such a toilet, not figuratively, but in the literal sense, the main thing is not to get confused and study all the controls and key assignments in advance! Because in many hotels the buttons do not translate into English and pressing the wrong key by accident can give you the wrong stream and so on.

There are many shopping centers in Tokyo, different goods are usually divided by floors, that is, men's clothes on one floor, children's clothes on the other, and women's clothes on the rest. There is also a floor with all sorts of little things, accessories and bookstores. On such floors you can often find some cafe with delicious coffee and rolls or Starbucks.

Here's how cool one of the partitions between the shops at Tokyo Central Station is designed:

A fully pumped electric bike.

Amazing, in my opinion, infographic, in a small shopping center in Yokohama.

I don't know what it is. If one of the readers tells me, I will be grateful!

People in the know, when I posted this picture on Instagram, they said that this is a very rare car.

The time is about 21-22 hours, a bookstore, and in the photo you see a shop window located right on the street. No locks, chains, glass or anything else - you can get up, take and look at any book from the window.

About MUJI

There is an unusual chain of stores in Japan - MUJI. Their unusualness lies in the fact that all goods in MUJI are not branded, that is, at all - there are not even tags with the name "MUJI" on things, and the essence of this network is selling high-quality and relatively inexpensive at the same time noname-things under one brand, mainly from China.

The range of things in MUJI is very large - everything is sold here from clothes, socks and shoes to cosmetics, food, furniture and various small household items like compact plastic boxes for small things, stink lamps and other things.

Картинка для привлечения внимания – вид на Йокогаму сверху. В следующей статье немного про Йокогаму, Хаконе и Химедзи. До встречи!

Япония. Токио в деталях

В первой части серии статей о Японии я рассказал вам про организацию поездки, стоимость билетов на самолет, транспорт, проживание в отелях, а также про другие особенности подготовительного этапа. Во второй части речь шла о Киото и японских скоростных поездах, а теперь настало время поговорить о моем любимом месте в Японии – Токио.

Everyone who has been abroad probably has a city that you want to return to again and again, which attracts. For me, that city is Tokyo. The strange thing is that in Tokyo, I personally feel very calm and relaxed, and this despite the fact that the capital of Japan, with more than 13 million inhabitants according to official data for 2010 alone, is distinguished by an incredible building density and a very dynamic rhythm of life, which is very easy to see , barely being in the morning train to the center or in the subway.

Before moving on to the story of Tokyo in pictures, and there I will try to add a minimum of text and a maximum of photos, I will give a brief information about the city. Tokyo is the capital of Japan with a population of over 13 million and an area of ​​over 2,000 square kilometers. It is wrong to call Tokyo a city in the usual sense of the word, it is a special administrative district (capital district, prefecture), consisting of many special districts. Tokyo is usually referred to as 23 special districts, and the districts, in turn, are divided into quarters.

It would seem that a reader who is preparing a trip to Tokyo does not need this information, but it is not. The fact is that Tokyo is diverse not only on paper, but also in reality. The city really varies greatly depending on which block and which district you are in at the moment. Moreover, it is better to study Tokyo, having previously at least briefly studied the history of individual special areas. Among them are shopping and business districts, which are distinguished by a large number of skyscrapers, and historical districts that have preserved part of the old buildings. Each special district has its own rich history and personality.

I want to start the story about Tokyo with a small block of information about the Tokyo subway, because the best way to get around the city is by subway and electric trains, and not by taxis, which are often in traffic jams.

Metro and electric trains

If you plan to ride the subway in Tokyo, you need to consider one important point - the city subway serves not one, but several companies, so they have different tickets. Fares vary depending on the number of stations you need to pass. A trip from one station to another will cost an average of 50 rubles, a trip through several stations - 60 rubles and more. Buying tickets is easy - there are ticket machines at each station, they accept coins and, sometimes, bills. Automatic machines, of course, can make you smile or even surprise with their appearance, they are quite a few years old, more than 10 or even 15 by eye, but all the machines work fine, and the Japanese, as I noticed, are generally reluctant to change the old ones, but all still working things, to new ones.

However, another way is more convenient and economical than one-time tickets - buying a universal plastic card, of which there are many in Japan. The most popular are SUICA and PASMO. By purchasing any of them and putting a certain amount on it, you can forget about daily metro tickets and calculating the correct cost of the trip. After all, if you buy the wrong ticket from the machine, for example, you need to pass ten stations, and you buy nine for travel, then when you exit the metro, you will have to go to the machine again and pay extra for the extra station. In a word, plastic in the form of SUICA or PASMO cards is more convenient. The card is replenished upon purchase, and then simply in vending machines, money is debited from it when entering the metro and exiting automatically, you do not need to calculate tariffs and so on. Moreover, these cards are accepted in most stores and cafes in Japan (in large and medium-sized cities - for sure), so you can use the card almost everywhere to pay for all services, food, transportation, museums and purchases in stores. Below are links to sites with information on maps:

At first glance, the Tokyo subway seems very complicated, but in fact it is not. The main thing is to deal with the transfer points, carefully look at the signs and, in fact, that's all. Getting out of the station to the right place is not a problem at all.

Here's what it looks like: at each station there are huge billboards with many signs-numbers, they show the exits to all important places from a particular station. In the center of Tokyo, these are signs to monuments, shops, museums, streets, and more.

Look for a place to which you need to get off, and then follow the number from the sign from the metro - everything is as simple as possible.

In the carriages, all information is duplicated in English, both voice announcements and text on the displays, so you can only miss your station when you fall asleep.

Tokyo in detail

Let's move on to the usual "comment and picture" format, I will try to tell you about all the interesting details and features of the city that I noticed. There will be no order in the further narrative, just a pile of photographs and comments on them. Let's go.

About architecture

The center of Tokyo is very beautiful at any time of the day - it combines old and new architecture, many skyscrapers that are unusual in shape and appearance, and not far from the station there is an imperial palace and a park.

Pay attention to all these Japanese - they saw how beautifully the sunset is reflected in the station building and just stopped to look at it, and many of them to take pictures of the sunset and the building itself. And this is all Japan.

Unusual architecture around Tokyo, how do you like this building?

There are a lot of skyscrapers in Tokyo and almost every one has its own observation deck, access is either free, Alison's Hair Food Wheat Germ Oil or for a nominal fee.

Picture from the series - "find a strange object in the frame."

On the contrary, there are low-rise areas or places that are simply interesting for other architecture, including residential buildings.

By the way, at the beginning I wrote that there are a lot of people in Tokyo, this is especially noticeable on weekends or holidays, if you are somewhere in the center. Here, for example, one of the streets with many shops, cafes and other things, pay attention to the number of people crossing the road:

But let's continue talking about architecture. In the center of Tokyo there are quite unusual buildings, both in form and in the materials used for decoration. No need to say much here, just take a look:

The Tokyo subway is certainly not a rival to the Moscow subway in terms of beauty and monumentality, but some beautiful corners can be found here:

In Japan, sewer manholes are very, very beautifully decorated. Each city has its own design manholes, often even individual districts use their own design. Unfortunately, on this trip I was not able to find a sufficient number of different hatches, but in the next I will try to correct this omission:

A manhole in Yokohama, near Tokyo

Many major stores in Tokyo have left-luggage offices for your belongings. But, unlike the simplest lockers we are used to at stores, in Tokyo these are real roomy lockers with a code and daily payment. If you walk around the city for half a day and are tired of a heavy backpack or, for example, bought all sorts of things, but you don’t want to take them to the hotel, because there are plans to take a walk, you can just go to one of these shops near the metro station from which you you will go to the hotel, and leave things there in the storage room, and continue on your own. This is very convenient when your hotel is far from the center of the city, and going there just to leave some things and go back to the city is a waste of time.

300 yen is about 100 rubles.

About food

There is an opinion that Japan has very strange and peculiar food and that a foreigner will not like "their food". This may be true for some, but even so, Tokyo is friendly to foreigners - it is full of Starbucks and various fast food, as well as local restaurants specializing in European cuisine. But flying to Japan to eat European food is, of course, strange.

The Japanese do eat sushi and sashimi (sushi and sashimi, to be exact). Sushi is a small ball of rice, a pinch of wasabi and some seafood, usually on top of the ball. More often, raw fish is used as seafood, but there are sushi not only with it. The rolls familiar to us are practically absent in Japan, of course, sushi rolls are also found here, but, as a rule, in any cafe or restaurant where sushi is served, you can count two or three types of rolls, everything else is traditional sushi.

What to add here? Even if you are not a fan of raw fish, you should try sushi, it is unusual and not at all like what is in the "Japanese" cafes in Russia.

When ordering sushi, people usually ask about wasabi - the question is not whether to serve wasabi with sushi, but whether to put a lot of wasabi in sushi or not to put at all. Also, sushi bars usually serve a small glass of miso soup and green tea for free.

If you haven't tried udon or ramen, they are worth a try in Tokyo (and indeed in Japan). In short, it's just wheat noodles in broth. Ramen - noodles cooked with egg, udon - without. But in every cafe and in every restaurant, as it turns out, these dishes are completely different and are served in completely different forms with various additives. You can take it just at random, showing a picture from the menu. When the ordered ramen or udon is brought to you, the question may arise how it is. There are two options here - ask the waiter or look around and see how the others are eating.If you are sitting in a small cafe, and especially if you are sitting in some "ramen" or "udon" right opposite the kitchen (bar format), you can just ask your neighbor how to eat (or wait until the neighbor takes pity and helps himself , seeing your futile attempts to figure it out). The Japanese are very, very responsive, if a tourist asks them about something, because a tourist here is equated to a child who does not know anything, so they help tourists accordingly. So feel free to ask, if anything. Even if your neighbor doesn't speak English and you don't speak Japanese, sign language will most likely win!

Here are some shots from a ramen shop located in the basement of one of the buildings somewhere in the city center. Here, a Japanese sitting next to us helped us figure out how to eat.

In many cafes in Tokyo, and in other cities of Japan, stools and chairs are equipped with special pockets for a bag, a very convenient thing, by the way. No need to put the bag on the floor or occupy another chair with it. If you go to a cafe with a large suitcase, you can just give it away at the entrance - nice employees will put the suitcase separately from the table and return it to you at the exit.

And one more thing. In sushi bars and various cafes, especially at train stations and other places where there are a lot of people, there are long queues in the evenings. The main thing here is just to calmly stand in line - they are neat in Japan and stand in them all evenly - and wait. As in China or Korea, it is customary here to transfer a card or money for payment with two hands and receive change and a check. You can also, of course, not do this, but it’s better to do it - this way you will get another smile in response and a drop of positive emotions (vibration, if you are like Seryozha Kuzmin).

About details

You've probably read or at least heard about high-tech toilets in Japan and South Korea. There are a lot of buttons and sometimes even entire control panels for jet operation, heating, and so on, seriously. So - when you find yourself on such a toilet, not figuratively, but in the literal sense, the main thing is not to get confused and study all the controls and key assignments in advance! Because in many hotels the buttons do not translate into English and pressing the wrong key by accident can give you the wrong stream and so on.

There are many shopping centers in Tokyo, different goods are usually divided by floors, that is, men's clothes on one floor, children's clothes on the other, and women's clothes on the rest. There is also a floor with all sorts of little things, accessories and bookstores. On such floors you can often find some cafe with delicious coffee and rolls or Starbucks.

Here's how cool one of the partitions between the shops at Tokyo Central Station is designed:

A fully pumped electric bike.

Amazing, in my opinion, infographic, in a small shopping center in Yokohama.

I don't know what it is. If one of the readers tells me, I will be grateful!

People in the know, when I posted this picture on Instagram, they said that this is a very rare car.

The time is about 21-22 hours, a bookstore, and in the photo you see a shop window located right on the street. No locks, chains, glass or anything else - you can get up, take and look at any book from the window.

About MUJI

There is an unusual chain of stores in Japan - MUJI. Their unusualness lies in the fact that all goods in MUJI are not branded, that is, at all - there are not even tags with the name "MUJI" on things, and the essence of this network is selling high-quality and relatively inexpensive at the same time noname-things under one brand, mainly from China.

The range of things in MUJI is very large - everything is sold here from clothes, socks and shoes to cosmetics, food, furniture and various small household items like compact plastic boxes for small things, stink lamps and other things.

Картинка для привлечения внимания – вид на Йокогаму сверху. В следующей статье немного про Йокогаму, Хаконе и Химедзи. До встречи!

Япония. Токио в деталях

В первой части серии статей о Японии я рассказал вам про организацию поездки, стоимость билетов на самолет, транспорт, проживание в отелях, а также про другие особенности подготовительного этапа. Во второй части речь шла о Киото и японских скоростных поездах, а теперь настало время поговорить о моем любимом месте в Японии – Токио.

Everyone who has been abroad probably has a city that you want to return to again and again, which attracts. For me, that city is Tokyo. The strange thing is that in Tokyo, I personally feel very calm and relaxed, and this despite the fact that the capital of Japan, with more than 13 million inhabitants according to official data for 2010 alone, is distinguished by an incredible building density and a very dynamic rhythm of life, which is very easy to see , barely being in the morning train to the center or in the subway.

Before moving on to the story of Tokyo in pictures, and there I will try to add a minimum of text and a maximum of photos, I will give a brief information about the city. Tokyo is the capital of Japan with a population of over 13 million and an area of ​​over 2,000 square kilometers. It is wrong to call Tokyo a city in the usual sense of the word, it is a special administrative district (capital district, prefecture), consisting of many special districts. Tokyo is usually referred to as 23 special districts, and the districts, in turn, are divided into quarters.

It would seem that a reader who is preparing a trip to Tokyo does not need this information, but it is not. The fact is that Tokyo is diverse not only on paper, but also in reality. The city really varies greatly depending on which block and which district you are in at the moment. Moreover, it is better to study Tokyo, having previously at least briefly studied the history of individual special areas. Among them are shopping and business districts, which are distinguished by a large number of skyscrapers, and historical districts that have preserved part of the old buildings. Each special district has its own rich history and personality.

I want to start the story about Tokyo with a small block of information about the Tokyo subway, because the best way to get around the city is by subway and electric trains, and not by taxis, which are often in traffic jams.

Metro and electric trains

If you plan to ride the subway in Tokyo, you need to consider one important point - the city subway serves not one, but several companies, so they have different tickets. Fares vary depending on the number of stations you need to pass. A trip from one station to another will cost an average of 50 rubles, a trip through several stations - 60 rubles and more. Buying tickets is easy - there are ticket machines at each station, they accept coins and, sometimes, bills. Automatic machines, of course, can make you smile or even surprise with their appearance, they are quite a few years old, more than 10 or even 15 by eye, but all the machines work fine, and the Japanese, as I noticed, are generally reluctant to change the old ones, but all still working things, to new ones.

However, another way is more convenient and economical than one-time tickets - buying a universal plastic card, of which there are many in Japan. The most popular are SUICA and PASMO. By purchasing any of them and putting a certain amount on it, you can forget about daily metro tickets and calculating the correct cost of the trip. After all, if you buy the wrong ticket from the machine, for example, you need to pass ten stations, and you buy nine for travel, then when you exit the metro, you will have to go to the machine again and pay extra for the extra station. In a word, plastic in the form of SUICA or PASMO cards is more convenient. The card is replenished upon purchase, and then simply in vending machines, money is debited from it when entering the metro and exiting automatically, you do not need to calculate tariffs and so on. Moreover, these cards are accepted in most stores and cafes in Japan (in large and medium-sized cities - for sure), so you can use the card almost everywhere to pay for all services, food, transportation, museums and purchases in stores. Below are links to sites with information on maps:

At first glance, the Tokyo subway seems very complicated, but in fact it is not. The main thing is to deal with the transfer points, carefully look at the signs and, in fact, that's all. Getting out of the station to the right place is not a problem at all.

Here's what it looks like: at each station there are huge billboards with many signs-numbers, they show the exits to all important places from a particular station. In the center of Tokyo, these are signs to monuments, shops, museums, streets, and more.

Look for a place to which you need to get off, and then follow the number from the sign from the metro - everything is as simple as possible.

In the carriages, all information is duplicated in English, both voice announcements and text on the displays, so you can only miss your station when you fall asleep.

Tokyo in detail

Let's move on to the usual "comment and picture" format, I will try to tell you about all the interesting details and features of the city that I noticed. There will be no order in the further narrative, just a pile of photographs and comments on them. Let's go.

About architecture

The center of Tokyo is very beautiful at any time of the day - it combines old and new architecture, many skyscrapers that are unusual in shape and appearance, and not far from the station there is an imperial palace and a park.

Pay attention to all these Japanese - they saw how beautifully the sunset is reflected in the station building and just stopped to look at it, and many of them to take pictures of the sunset and the building itself. And this is all Japan.

Unusual architecture around Tokyo, how do you like this building?

There are many skyscrapers in Tokyo and almost all of them have their own observation deck, access is either free, Alison's Hair Food Wheat Germ Oil, or for a nominal fee.

There are many skyscrapers in Tokyo and almost every one has its own observation deck, access is either free, Alison's Hair Food Wheat Germ Oil Alison's Hair Food Wheat Germ Oil or for a nominal fee.

Picture from the series - "find a strange object in the frame."

On the contrary, there are low-rise districts or places that are simply interesting for other architecture, including residential buildings.

By the way, at the beginning I wrote that there are a lot of people in Tokyo, this is especially noticeable on weekends or holidays, if you are somewhere in the center. Here, for example, one of the streets with many shops, cafes and other things, pay attention to the number of people crossing the road:

But let's continue talking about architecture. In the center of Tokyo there are quite unusual buildings, both in form and in the materials used for decoration. No need to say much here, just take a look:

The Tokyo subway is certainly not a rival to the Moscow subway in terms of beauty and monumentality, but some beautiful corners can be found here:

In Japan, sewer manholes are very, very beautifully decorated. Each city has its own design manholes, often even individual districts use their own design. Unfortunately, on this trip I was not able to find a sufficient number of different hatches, but in the next I will try to correct this omission:

A manhole in Yokohama, near Tokyo

Many major stores in Tokyo have left-luggage offices for your belongings. But, unlike the simplest lockers we are used to at stores, in Tokyo these are real roomy lockers with a code and daily payment. If you walk around the city for half a day and are tired of a heavy backpack or, for example, bought all sorts of things, but you don’t want to take them to the hotel, because there are plans to take a walk, you can just go to one of these shops near the metro station from which you you will go to the hotel, and leave things there in the storage room, and continue on your own. This is very convenient when your hotel is far from the center of the city, and going there just to leave some things and go back to the city is a waste of time.

300 yen is about 100 rubles.

About food

There is an opinion that Japan has very strange and peculiar food and that a foreigner will not like "their food". This may be true for some, but even so, Tokyo is friendly to foreigners - it is full of Starbucks and various fast food, as well as local restaurants specializing in European cuisine. But flying to Japan to eat European food is, of course, strange.

The Japanese do eat sushi and sashimi (sushi and sashimi, to be exact). Sushi is a small ball of rice, a pinch of wasabi and some seafood, usually on top of the ball. More often, raw fish is used as seafood, but there are sushi not only with it. The rolls familiar to us are practically absent in Japan, of course, sushi rolls are also found here, but, as a rule, in any cafe or restaurant where sushi is served, you can count two or three types of rolls, everything else is traditional sushi.

What to add here? Even if you are not a fan of raw fish, you should try sushi, it is unusual and not at all like what is in the "Japanese" cafes in Russia.

When ordering sushi, people usually ask about wasabi - the question is not whether to serve wasabi with sushi, but whether to put a lot of wasabi in sushi or not to put at all. Also, sushi bars usually serve a small glass of miso soup and green tea for free.

If you haven't tried udon or ramen, they are worth a try in Tokyo (and indeed in Japan). In short, it's just wheat noodles in broth. Ramen - noodles cooked with egg, udon - without. But in every cafe and in every restaurant, as it turns out, these dishes are completely different and are served in completely different forms with various additives. You can take it just at random, showing a picture from the menu. When the ordered ramen or udon is brought to you, the question may arise how it is. There are two options here - ask the waiter or look around and see how the others are eating.If you are sitting in a small cafe, and especially if you are sitting in some "ramen" or "udon" right opposite the kitchen (bar format), you can just ask your neighbor how to eat (or wait until the neighbor takes pity and helps himself , seeing your futile attempts to figure it out). The Japanese are very, very responsive, if a tourist asks them about something, because a tourist here is equated to a child who does not know anything, so they help tourists accordingly. So feel free to ask, if anything. Even if your neighbor doesn't speak English and you don't speak Japanese, sign language will most likely win!

Here are some shots from a ramen shop located in the basement of one of the buildings somewhere in the city center. Here, a Japanese sitting next to us helped us figure out how to eat.

In many cafes in Tokyo, and in other cities of Japan, stools and chairs are equipped with special pockets for a bag, a very convenient thing, by the way. No need to put the bag on the floor or occupy another chair with it. If you go to a cafe with a large suitcase, you can just give it away at the entrance - nice employees will put the suitcase separately from the table and return it to you at the exit.

And one more thing. In sushi bars and various cafes, especially at train stations and other places where there are a lot of people, there are long queues in the evenings. The main thing here is just to calmly stand in line - they are neat in Japan and stand in them all evenly - and wait. As in China or Korea, it is customary here to transfer a card or money for payment with two hands and receive change and a check. You can also, of course, not do this, but it’s better to do it - this way you will get another smile in response and a drop of positive emotions (vibration, if you are like Seryozha Kuzmin).

About details

You've probably read or at least heard about high-tech toilets in Japan and South Korea. There are a lot of buttons and sometimes even entire control panels for jet operation, heating, and so on, seriously. So - when you find yourself on such a toilet, not figuratively, but in the literal sense, the main thing is not to get confused and study all the controls and key assignments in advance! Because in many hotels the buttons do not translate into English and pressing the wrong key by accident can give you the wrong stream and so on.

There are many shopping centers in Tokyo, different goods are usually divided by floors, that is, men's clothes on one floor, children's clothes on the other, and women's clothes on the rest. There is also a floor with all sorts of little things, accessories and bookstores. On such floors you can often find some cafe with delicious coffee and rolls or Starbucks.

Here's how nicely decorated one of the partitions between the shops at the Central Station in Tokyo:

A fully pumped electric bike.

Amazing, in my opinion, infographic, in a small shopping center in Yokohama.

I don't know what it is. If one of the readers tells me, I will be grateful!

People in the know, when I posted this picture on Instagram, they said that this is a very rare car.

The time is about 21-22 hours, a bookstore, and in the photo you see a shop window located right on the street. No locks, chains, glass or anything else - you can get up, take and look at any book from the window.

About MUJI

There is an unusual chain of stores in Japan - MUJI. Their unusualness lies in the fact that all goods in MUJI are not branded, that is, at all - there are not even tags with the name "MUJI" on things, and the essence of this network is selling high-quality and relatively inexpensive at the same time noname-things under one brand, mainly from China.

The range of things in MUJI is very large - everything is sold here from clothes, socks and shoes to cosmetics, food, furniture and various small household items like compact plastic boxes for small things, stink lamps and other things.

An attention-getting picture is a view of Yokohama from above. In the next article, a little about Yokohama, Hakone and Himeji. See you soon!