About the initial soft suffering

Sports Equipment in Ethiopia

People habitually swear at the programs pre-installed in smartphones, and the question is very difficult. Is it good or bad? And a separate topic is the quick and correct arrangement of a “naked” smartphone. Surprisingly, such devices are quite common.

I do not pretend to be the “ultimate truth”, I just express my personal opinion. The software content of the device is a very individual thing, although almost everyone uses a certain “basic” set. Usually, Android smartphones come to us with a proprietary Google set installed, and on top of it, with the “author's” interface of the developer or customer, if the device is branded. The struggle for "a place in the sun" is serious. The initial message is clear: the user is obviously helpless, will eat what they give and say thank you. As for "proprietary" and non-removable software, the user often says not "thank you", but completely different words, but the vast majority are philosophical about such things.

Monopoly and indestructibility

Eldar recently wrote that it would be time to have an alternative to the Android operating system. Probably, Eldar is right globally, in the smartphone market, the operating system from Google already looks like a bad monopoly. I don't want to start another Holy War over Apple and iOS, it's just that the target audience of the iPhone intersects with that of Android only in the middle-upper price segments, and the prospects for Windows Phone in this sense are not obvious. But, in terms of convenience for the lazy consumer (and most of them), the universal Android is convenient and enjoyable, that's a fact. And Google is consistently working towards making life easier for the user. Think about how much time and energy went into the overall setup and creating a familiar working environment on a Symbian smartphone. And now? I entered my account information and mail with contacts in place, it remains to upload my applications from Google Play to the phone. Which Google Play will carefully display on the screen with a ribbon, you don’t even need to look for anything, remember. From the moment the device is taken out of the box until the familiar environment is fully restored, an hour and a half passes, if you slowly delve into the settings. And then there are almost no questions, everything is native-familiar. Agree, this is a great victory for the unification of interfaces and centralized storage of user data.

The "User's Guide" now fits on an A4 half sheet folded into an accordion. Indeed, there is no need to print a 200-page manual for 5-10% of users who buy their first smartphone in their lives. Moreover, those who voluntarily receive their first smartphone and three pages of the “niasilite” Guide.

We are completely spoiled and find it difficult to move the brain convolutions, even minimal customization of the interface is sometimes confusing. What kind of Christmas tree is incomprehensible on the menu, the New Year doesn’t seem to be coming soon? I could not figure it out for a long time, although the logic of the interface should have suggested: since the line of options is associated with sound-vibration and starts with “everything is off”, then the mysterious Christmas tree should indicate the “outdoor” mode.

Post a question on Twitter and was glad I wasn't the only one being stupid. The assumption about the “eco mode” was especially pleasing, although “quiet in the forest” is also not bad. Probably, the designer should have depicted a chainsaw next to the Christmas tree, then the right associations would have arisen.

About indestructible applications. The many-sided team of developers of add-ons over the Google interface has one more assistant in the form of an operator branding the device and putting their applications on it. This is probably good, applications are useful. And the bad thing is that manufacturers frankly follow the operator's lead and make numerous "super-applications" unremovable. And a strange phenomenon: a few years ago, when memory was "worth its weight in gold", some "Navigation" weighing 22 MB occupied a fair chunk of the available 160 MB of memory, and it was impossible to destroy it. Even if this "Navigation" was annoying because it was obviously worse than Google Maps. Now there is an order of magnitude more free memory for installing applications and the pre-installed software almost does not interfere with the user, but right now for some reason it turns out to be easily removed, I have already noticed several times. Is this a mysterious coincidence, or a feature of Android 4.x and above?

I would like to hope that it's not about the features of new versions of the operating system, but about cell phones with a delay, but the understanding that even the most loyal client is not always happy to see on the screen a garland of "proprietary" operator applications that eat up precious memory . This is especially true for budget smartphones, which are being sold more and more every day.

Operator "starting" services are a topic for a separate discussion, but it's not harmful to mention it, it will come in handy for someone. "Chameleon", "Kaleidoscope", "MTS News" will definitely climb on the screen like cockroaches when installing a new SIM card. And even when replacing a SIM card, some “unknown crap” called “Best Services” climbs for a couple of days. It is clear that it is better not to press "OK" out of harm's way, "Cancel" is also somehow uncomfortable. However, the "best" stopped annoying on the second day.

As for the "Chameleons" with "Kaleidoscopes", it is better to disable this joy through the SIM menu. Then until the replacement of the SIM card will no longer appear. It is irrational to call the contact center and swear, the service that was disabled on their side will again materialize without warning in a few months.

Software at start

The advantage of soft-packed smartphones is that, in addition to branded applications, there is usually a whole collection of widgets and software packages. If something does not suit you or something is missing, then you don’t have to go far, everything is at hand. Choose and drag to the screen. The average user is lazy and incurious by nature (for example, I) and does not look for good from the good. For the first time, when I encountered a practically “bare” (in terms of additional software) Android, I was puzzled by the search for suitable options. And I realized that the abundance of pre-installed programs and widgets is rather evil. Tinker a little once, get selected to your Google Play list and don’t bother anymore, it’s more correct. Several successful, in my opinion, finds.

Hours. The pre-installed monstrous clock plus weather widget was indignantly rejected (occupied half the screen), and nothing else appeared in the device. A search on Google Play caused hysterical laughter: Funny, Hot, Animal, Reverse (whooo?!), Pink, Talking and Damned watches. Unimaginable shapes and colors, with figures suffering from epilepsy. And, it seems, everything is with a makeweight in the form of advertising or requests to "help financially."

In the rubble of crazy pseudo-designer frills, I unearthed a primitive watch, hooray! Thank you, kind person, for 88 KB of simple temporary happiness, perfectly in harmony with the Yandex weather widget. Which I also respect for its stylish minimalism and manual update option.

Photo editor. In my opinion, a thing on a smartphone is not super-necessary, but it is desirable to have a number of basic functions at hand. Correct color balance, brightness-contrast, crop, etc. Without any frills. The program, which turned out to be in the kit, made me shudder: “cut”, “transfer” and “delete” functioned normally. Everything else is bad. The screenshot above is a software interpretation of the concept of “natural colors”, just some kind of sabotage.

Maybe it's for the best, willy-nilly I had to look for a replacement. For me, the excellent and free Snapseed photo editor turned out to be the best choice. Unfortunately, it only works on Android 4.0 and above. There is no official Russian version, but you can search the network for the Snapseed_1.5.0_RU.apk file, although I myself have not tried the translated version. Good photo editor. Soft, humane and quite intuitive, there is a useful graphic Help with hint arrows. If I understand correctly, the Android version appeared relatively recently, initially it was all done under iOS.

Correct "layered" interface layout: simple actions are easy and obvious, you start to get into the subtleties - everything is there, but hidden a little deeper. For those who are completely enthusiastic, there is a rich set of tools, up to correcting individual sections of the photo, correcting geometry (“the horizon is littered!” - the most primitive case) and much more. A very good product, I sincerely recommend it.

Network Entertainment. I am regularly asked about the origin of network indicator widgets on the smartphone screen. The program is called Network Signal Info, it is made by meticulous Germans and works on all Android operating systems. Russification is and clings automatically. The free version has slightly reduced functionality and the presence of ads, but "home and family" is fine.

The program monitors the status of connections to the cellular network and via Wi-Fi, displays the main parameters of the hardware and operating system of the device, can warn (including by voice) about the loss and appearance of a cellular network signal, writes logs if necessary, shows on the map the location of the serving base station, etc. This is not a professional tool, but for the average user there is enough information and it is conveniently collected in one bottle.

About the initial soft suffering

Sports Equipment in Ethiopia

People habitually swear at the programs pre-installed in smartphones, and the question is very difficult. Is it good or bad? And a separate topic is the quick and correct arrangement of a “naked” smartphone. Surprisingly, such devices are quite common.

I do not pretend to be the “ultimate truth”, I just express my personal opinion. The software content of the device is a very individual thing, although almost everyone uses a certain “basic” set. Usually, Android smartphones come to us with a proprietary Google set installed, and on top of it, with the “author's” interface of the developer or customer, if the device is branded. The struggle for "a place in the sun" is serious. The initial message is clear: the user is obviously helpless, will eat what they give and say thank you. As for "proprietary" and non-removable software, the user often says not "thank you", but completely different words, but the vast majority are philosophical about such things.

Monopoly and indestructibility

Eldar recently wrote that it would be time to have an alternative to the Android operating system. Probably, Eldar is right globally, in the smartphone market, the operating system from Google already looks like a bad monopoly. I don't want to start another Holy War over Apple and iOS, it's just that the target audience of the iPhone intersects with that of Android only in the middle-upper price segments, and the prospects for Windows Phone in this sense are not obvious. But, in terms of convenience for the lazy consumer (and most of them), the universal Android is convenient and enjoyable, that's a fact. And Google is consistently working towards making life easier for the user. Think about how much time and energy went into the overall setup and creating a familiar working environment on a Symbian smartphone. And now? I entered my account information and mail with contacts in place, it remains to upload my applications from Google Play to the phone. Which Google Play will carefully display on the screen with a ribbon, you don’t even need to look for anything, remember. From the moment the device is taken out of the box until the familiar environment is fully restored, an hour and a half passes, if you slowly delve into the settings. And then there are almost no questions, everything is native-familiar. Agree, this is a great victory for the unification of interfaces and centralized storage of user data.

The "User's Guide" now fits on an A4 half sheet folded into an accordion. Indeed, there is no need to print a 200-page manual for 5-10% of users who buy their first smartphone in their lives. Moreover, those who voluntarily receive their first smartphone and three pages of the “niasilite” Guide.

We are completely spoiled and find it difficult to move the brain convolutions, even minimal customization of the interface is sometimes confusing. What kind of Christmas tree is incomprehensible on the menu, the New Year doesn’t seem to be coming soon? I could not figure it out for a long time, although the logic of the interface should have suggested: since the line of options is associated with sound-vibration and starts with “everything is off”, then the mysterious Christmas tree should indicate the “outdoor” mode.

Post a question on Twitter and was glad I wasn't the only one being stupid. The assumption about the “eco mode” was especially pleasing, although “quiet in the forest” is also not bad. Probably, the designer should have depicted a chainsaw next to the Christmas tree, then the right associations would have arisen.

About indestructible applications. The many-sided team of developers of add-ons over the Google interface has one more assistant in the form of an operator branding the device and putting their applications on it. This is probably good, applications are useful. And the bad thing is that manufacturers frankly follow the operator's lead and make numerous "super-applications" unremovable. And a strange phenomenon: a few years ago, when memory was "worth its weight in gold", some "Navigation" weighing 22 MB occupied a fair chunk of the available 160 MB of memory, and it was impossible to destroy it. Even if this "Navigation" was annoying because it was obviously worse than Google Maps. Now there is an order of magnitude more free memory for installing applications and the pre-installed software almost does not interfere with the user, but right now for some reason it turns out to be easily removed, I have already noticed several times. Is this a mysterious coincidence, or a feature of Android 4.x and above?

I would like to hope that it's not about the features of new versions of the operating system, but about cell phones with a delay, but the understanding that even the most loyal client is not always happy to see on the screen a garland of "proprietary" operator applications that eat up precious memory . This is especially true for budget smartphones, which are being sold more and more every day.

Operator "starting" services are a topic for a separate discussion, but it's not harmful to mention it, it will come in handy for someone. "Chameleon", "Kaleidoscope", "MTS News" will definitely climb on the screen like cockroaches when installing a new SIM card. And even when replacing a SIM card, some “unknown crap” called “Best Services” climbs for a couple of days. It is clear that it is better not to press "OK" out of harm's way, "Cancel" is also somehow uncomfortable. However, the "best" stopped annoying on the second day.

As for "Chameleons" with "Kaleidoscopes", it is better to disable this joy through the SIM menu. Then until the replacement of the SIM card will no longer appear. It is irrational to call the contact center and swear, the service that was disabled on their side will again materialize without warning in a few months.

Software at start

The advantage of soft-packed smartphones is that, in addition to branded applications, there is usually a whole collection of widgets and software packages. If something does not suit you or something is missing, then you don’t have to go far, everything is at hand. Choose and drag to the screen. The average user is lazy and incurious by nature (for example, I) and does not look for good from the good. For the first time, when I encountered a practically “bare” (in terms of additional software) Android, I was puzzled by the search for suitable options. And I realized that the abundance of pre-installed programs and widgets is rather evil. Tinker a little once, get selected to your Google Play list and don’t bother anymore, it’s more correct. Several successful, in my opinion, finds.

Hours. The pre-installed monstrous clock plus weather widget was indignantly rejected (occupied half the screen), and nothing else appeared in the device. A search on Google Play caused hysterical laughter: Funny, Hot, Animal, Reverse (whooo?!), Pink, Talking and Damned watches. Unimaginable shapes and colors, with figures suffering from epilepsy. And, it seems, everything is with a makeweight in the form of advertising or requests to "help financially."

In the rubble of crazy pseudo-designer frills, I unearthed a primitive watch, hooray! Thank you, kind person, for 88 KB of simple temporary happiness, perfectly in harmony with the Yandex weather widget. Which I also respect for its stylish minimalism and manual update option.

Photo editor. In my opinion, a thing on a smartphone is not super-necessary, but it is desirable to have a number of basic functions at hand. Correct color balance, brightness-contrast, crop, etc. Without any frills. The program, which turned out to be in the kit, made me shudder: “cut”, “transfer” and “delete” functioned normally. Everything else is bad. The screenshot above is a software interpretation of the concept of “natural colors”, just some kind of sabotage.

Maybe it's for the best, willy-nilly I had to look for a replacement. For me, the excellent and free Snapseed photo editor turned out to be the best choice. Unfortunately, it only works on Android 4.0 and above. There is no official Russian version, but you can search the network for the Snapseed_1.5.0_RU.apk file, although I myself have not tried the translated version. Good photo editor. Soft, humane and quite intuitive, there is a useful graphic Help with hint arrows. If I understand correctly, the Android version appeared relatively recently, initially it was all done under iOS.

Correct "layered" interface layout: simple actions are easy and obvious, you start to get into the subtleties - everything is there, but hidden a little deeper. For those who are completely enthusiastic, there is a rich set of tools, up to correcting individual sections of the photo, correcting geometry (“the horizon is littered!” - the most primitive case) and much more. A very good product, I sincerely recommend it.

Network Entertainment. I am regularly asked about the origin of network indicator widgets on the smartphone screen. The program is called Network Signal Info, it is made by meticulous Germans and works on all Android operating systems. Russification is and clings automatically. The free version has slightly reduced functionality and the presence of ads, but "home and family" is fine.

The program monitors the status of connections to the cellular network and via Wi-Fi, displays the main parameters of the hardware and operating system of the device, can warn (including by voice) about the loss and appearance of a cellular network signal, writes logs if necessary, shows on the map the location of the serving base station, etc. This is not a professional tool, but for the average user there is enough information and it is conveniently collected in one bottle.

About the initial soft suffering

Sports Equipment in Ethiopia

People habitually swear at the programs pre-installed in smartphones, and the question is very difficult. Is it good or bad? And a separate topic is the quick and correct arrangement of a “naked” smartphone. Surprisingly, such devices are quite common.

I do not pretend to be the “ultimate truth”, I just express my personal opinion. The software content of the device is a very individual thing, although almost everyone uses a certain “basic” set. Usually, Android smartphones come to us with a proprietary Google set installed, and on top of it, with the “author's” interface of the developer or customer, if the device is branded. The struggle for "a place in the sun" is serious. The initial message is clear: the user is obviously helpless, will eat what they give and say thank you. As for "proprietary" and non-removable software, the user often says not "thank you", but completely different words, but the vast majority are philosophical about such things.

Monopoly and indestructibility

Eldar recently wrote that it would be time to have an alternative to the Android operating system. Probably, Eldar is right globally, in the smartphone market, the operating system from Google already looks like a bad monopoly. I don't want to start another Holy War over Apple and iOS, it's just that the target audience of the iPhone intersects with that of Android only in the middle-upper price segments, and the prospects for Windows Phone in this sense are not obvious. But, in terms of convenience for the lazy consumer (and most of them), the universal Android is convenient and enjoyable, that's a fact. And Google is consistently working towards making life easier for the user. Think about how much time and energy went into the overall setup and creating a familiar working environment on a Symbian smartphone. And now? I entered my account information and mail with contacts in place, it remains to upload my applications from Google Play to the phone. Which Google Play will carefully display on the screen with a ribbon, you don’t even need to look for anything, remember. From the moment the device is taken out of the box until the familiar environment is fully restored, an hour and a half passes, if you slowly delve into the settings. And then there are almost no questions, everything is native-familiar. Agree, this is a great victory for the unification of interfaces and centralized storage of user data.

The "User's Guide" now fits on an A4 half sheet folded into an accordion. Indeed, there is no need to print a 200-page manual for 5-10% of users who buy their first smartphone in their lives. Moreover, those who voluntarily receive their first smartphone and three pages of the “niasilite” Guide.

We are completely spoiled and find it difficult to move the brain convolutions, even minimal customization of the interface is sometimes confusing. What kind of Christmas tree is incomprehensible on the menu, the New Year doesn’t seem to be coming soon? I could not figure it out for a long time, although the logic of the interface should have suggested: since the line of options is associated with sound-vibration and starts with “everything is off”, then the mysterious Christmas tree should indicate the “outdoor” mode.

Post a question on Twitter and was glad I wasn't the only one being stupid. The assumption about the “eco mode” was especially pleasing, although “quiet in the forest” is also not bad. Probably, the designer should have depicted a chainsaw next to the Christmas tree, then the right associations would have arisen.

About indestructible applications. The many-sided team of developers of add-ons over the Google interface has one more assistant in the form of an operator branding the device and putting their applications on it. This is probably good, applications are useful. And the bad thing is that manufacturers frankly follow the operator's lead and make numerous "super-applications" unremovable. And a strange phenomenon: a few years ago, when memory was "worth its weight in gold", some "Navigation" weighing 22 MB occupied a fair chunk of the available 160 MB of memory, and it was impossible to destroy it. Even if this “Navigation” was annoying because it was obviously worse than Google Maps. Now there is an order of magnitude more free memory for installing applications and the pre-installed software almost does not interfere with the user, but right now for some reason it turns out to be easily removed, I have already noticed several times. Is this a mysterious coincidence, or a feature of Android 4.x and above?

I would like to hope that it's not about the features of new versions of the operating system, but about cell phones with a delay, but the understanding that even the most loyal client is not always happy to see on the screen a garland of "proprietary" operator applications that eat up precious memory . This is especially true for budget smartphones, which are being sold more and more every day.

Operator "starting" services are a topic for a separate discussion, but it's not harmful to mention it, it will come in handy for someone. "Chameleon", "Kaleidoscope", "MTS News" will definitely climb on the screen like cockroaches when installing a new SIM card. And even when replacing a SIM card, some “unknown crap” called “Best Services” climbs for a couple of days. It is clear that it is better not to press "OK" out of harm's way, "Cancel" is also somehow uncomfortable. However, the "best" stopped annoying on the second day.

As for "Chameleons" with "Kaleidoscopes", it is better to disable this joy through the SIM menu. Then until the replacement of the SIM card will no longer appear. It is irrational to call the contact center and swear, the service that was disabled on their side will again materialize without warning in a few months.

Software at start

The advantage of soft-packed smartphones is that, in addition to branded applications, there is usually a whole collection of widgets and software packages. If something does not suit you or something is missing, then you don’t have to go far, everything is at hand. Choose and drag to the screen. The average user is lazy and incurious by nature (for example, I) and does not look for good from the good. For the first time, when I encountered a practically “bare” (in terms of additional software) Android, I was puzzled by the search for suitable options. And I realized that the abundance of pre-installed programs and widgets is rather evil. Tinker a little once, get selected to your Google Play list and don’t bother anymore, it’s more correct. Several successful, in my opinion, finds.

Hours. The pre-installed monstrous clock plus weather widget was indignantly rejected (occupied half the screen), and nothing else appeared in the device. A search on Google Play caused hysterical laughter: Funny, Hot, Animal, Reverse (whooo?!), Pink, Talking and Damned watches. Unimaginable shapes and colors, with figures suffering from epilepsy. And, it seems, everything is with a makeweight in the form of advertising or requests to "help financially."

In the rubble of crazy pseudo-designer frills, I unearthed a primitive watch, hooray! Thank you, kind person, for 88 KB of simple temporary happiness, perfectly in harmony with the Yandex weather widget. Which I also respect for its stylish minimalism and manual update option.

Photo editor. In my opinion, a thing on a smartphone is not super-necessary, but it is desirable to have a number of basic functions at hand. Correct color balance, brightness-contrast, crop, etc. Without any frills. The program, which turned out to be in the kit, made me shudder: “cut”, “transfer” and “delete” functioned normally. Everything else is bad. The screenshot above is a software interpretation of the concept of “natural colors”, just some kind of sabotage.

Maybe it's for the best, willy-nilly I had to look for a replacement. For me, the excellent and free Snapseed photo editor turned out to be the best choice. Unfortunately, it only works on Android 4.0 and above. There is no official Russian version, but you can search the network for the Snapseed_1.5.0_RU.apk file, although I myself have not tried the translated version. Good photo editor. Soft, humane and quite intuitive, there is a useful graphic Help with hint arrows. If I understand correctly, the Android version appeared relatively recently, initially it was all done under iOS.

Correct "layered" interface layout: simple actions are easy and obvious, you start to get into the subtleties - everything is there, but hidden a little deeper. For those who are completely enthusiastic, there is a rich set of tools, up to correcting individual sections of the photo, correcting geometry (“the horizon is littered!” - the most primitive case) and much more. A very good product, I sincerely recommend it.

Network Entertainment. I am regularly asked about the origin of network indicator widgets on the smartphone screen. The program is called Network Signal Info, it is made by meticulous Germans and works on all Android operating systems. Russification is and clings automatically. The free version has slightly reduced functionality and the presence of ads, but "home and family" is fine.

The program monitors the status of connections to the cellular network and via Wi-Fi, displays the main parameters of the hardware and operating system of the device, can warn (including by voice) about the loss and appearance of a cellular network signal, writes logs if necessary, shows on the map the location of the serving base station, etc. This is not a professional tool, but for the average user there is enough information and it is conveniently collected in one bottle.

About the initial soft suffering

Sports Equipment in Ethiopia Sports Equipment in Ethiopia

People habitually swear at the programs pre-installed in smartphones, and the question is very difficult. Is it good or bad? And a separate topic is the quick and correct arrangement of a “naked” smartphone. Surprisingly, such devices are quite common.

I do not pretend to be the “ultimate truth”, I just express my personal opinion. The software content of the device is a very individual thing, although almost everyone uses a certain “basic” set. Usually, Android smartphones come to us with a proprietary Google set installed, and on top of it, with the “author's” interface of the developer or customer, if the device is branded. The struggle for "a place in the sun" is serious. The initial message is clear: the user is obviously helpless, will eat what they give and say thank you. As for "proprietary" and non-removable software, the user often says not "thank you", but completely different words, but the vast majority are philosophical about such things.

Monopoly and indestructibility

Eldar recently wrote that it would be time to have an alternative to the Android operating system. Probably, Eldar is right globally, in the smartphone market, the operating system from Google already looks like a bad monopoly. I don't want to start another Holy War over Apple and iOS, it's just that the target audience of the iPhone intersects with that of Android only in the middle-upper price segments, and the prospects for Windows Phone in this sense are not obvious. But, in terms of convenience for the lazy consumer (and most of them), the universal Android is convenient and enjoyable, that's a fact. And Google is consistently working towards making life easier for the user. Think about how much time and energy went into the overall setup and creating a familiar working environment on a Symbian smartphone. And now? I entered my account information and mail with contacts in place, it remains to upload my applications from Google Play to the phone. Which Google Play will carefully display on the screen with a ribbon, you don’t even need to look for anything, remember. From the moment the device is taken out of the box until the familiar environment is fully restored, an hour and a half passes, if you slowly delve into the settings. And then there are almost no questions, everything is native-familiar. Agree, this is a great victory for the unification of interfaces and centralized storage of user data.

The "User's Guide" now fits on an A4 half sheet folded into an accordion. Indeed, there is no need to print a 200-page manual for 5-10% of users who buy their first smartphone in their lives. Moreover, those who voluntarily receive their first smartphone and three pages of the “niasilite” Guide.

We are completely spoiled and find it difficult to move the brain convolutions, even minimal customization of the interface is sometimes confusing. What kind of Christmas tree is incomprehensible on the menu, the New Year doesn’t seem to be coming soon? I could not figure it out for a long time, although the logic of the interface should have suggested: since the line of options is associated with sound-vibration and starts with “everything is off”, then the mysterious Christmas tree should indicate the “outdoor” mode.

Post a question on Twitter and was glad I wasn't the only one being stupid. The assumption about the “eco mode” was especially pleasing, although “quiet in the forest” is also not bad. Probably, the designer should have depicted a chainsaw next to the Christmas tree, then the right associations would have arisen.

About indestructible applications. The many-sided team of developers of add-ons over the Google interface has one more assistant in the form of an operator branding the device and putting their applications on it. This is probably good, applications are useful. And the bad thing is that manufacturers frankly follow the operator's lead and make numerous "super-applications" unremovable. And a strange phenomenon: a few years ago, when memory was "worth its weight in gold", some "Navigation" weighing 22 MB occupied a fair chunk of the available 160 MB of memory, and it was impossible to destroy it. Even if this “Navigation” was annoying because it was obviously worse than Google Maps. Now there is an order of magnitude more free memory for installing applications and the pre-installed software almost does not interfere with the user, but right now for some reason it turns out to be easily removed, I have already noticed several times. Is this a mysterious coincidence, or a feature of Android 4.x and above?

I would like to hope that it's not about the features of new versions of the operating system, but about cell phones with a delay, but the understanding that even the most loyal client is not always happy to see on the screen a garland of "proprietary" operator applications that eat up precious memory . This is especially true for budget smartphones, which are being sold more and more every day.

Operator "starting" services are a topic for a separate discussion, but it's not harmful to mention it, it will come in handy for someone. "Chameleon", "Kaleidoscope", "MTS News" will definitely climb on the screen like cockroaches when installing a new SIM card. And even when replacing a SIM card, some “unknown crap” called “Best Services” climbs for a couple of days. It is clear that it is better not to press "OK" out of harm's way, "Cancel" is also somehow uncomfortable. However, the "best" stopped annoying on the second day.

As for "Chameleons" with "Kaleidoscopes", it is better to disable this joy through the SIM menu. Then until the replacement of the SIM card will no longer appear. It is irrational to call the contact center and swear, the service that was disabled on their side will again materialize without warning in a few months.

Software at start

The advantage of soft-packed smartphones is that, in addition to branded applications, there is usually a whole collection of widgets and software packages. If something does not suit you or something is missing, then you don’t have to go far, everything is at hand. Choose and drag to the screen. The average user is lazy and incurious by nature (for example, I) and does not look for good from the good. For the first time, when I encountered a practically “bare” (in terms of additional software) Android, I was puzzled by the search for suitable options. And I realized that the abundance of pre-installed programs and widgets is rather evil. Tinker a little once, get selected to your Google Play list and don’t bother anymore, it’s more correct. Several successful, in my opinion, finds.

Clock. The pre-installed monstrous clock plus weather widget was indignantly rejected (occupied half the screen), and nothing else appeared in the device. A search on Google Play caused hysterical laughter: Funny, Hot, Animal, Reverse (whooo?!), Pink, Talking and Damned watches. Unimaginable shapes and colors, with figures suffering from epilepsy. And, it seems, everything is with a makeweight in the form of advertising or requests to "help financially."

In the rubble of crazy pseudo-designer frills, I unearthed a primitive watch, hooray! Thank you, kind person, for 88 KB of simple temporary happiness, perfectly in harmony with the Yandex weather widget. Which I also respect for its stylish minimalism and manual update option.

Photo editor. In my opinion, a thing on a smartphone is not super-necessary, but it is desirable to have a number of basic functions at hand. Correct color balance, brightness-contrast, crop, etc. Without any frills. The program, which turned out to be in the kit, made me shudder: “cut”, “transfer” and “delete” functioned normally. Everything else is bad. The screenshot above is a software interpretation of the concept of “natural colors”, just some kind of sabotage.

Maybe it's for the best, willy-nilly I had to look for a replacement. For me, the excellent and free Snapseed photo editor turned out to be the best choice. Unfortunately, it only works on Android 4.0 and above. There is no official Russian version, but you can search the network for the Snapseed_1.5.0_RU.apk file, although I myself have not tried the translated version. Good photo editor. Soft, humane and quite intuitive, there is a useful graphic Help with hint arrows. If I understand correctly, the Android version appeared relatively recently, initially it was all done under iOS.

Correct "layered" interface layout: simple actions are easy and obvious, you start to get into the subtleties - everything is there, but hidden a little deeper. For those who are completely enthusiastic, there is a rich set of tools, up to correcting individual sections of the photo, correcting geometry (“the horizon is littered!” - the most primitive case) and much more. A very good product, I sincerely recommend it.

Network entertainment. I am regularly asked about the origin of network indicator widgets on the smartphone screen. The program is called Network Signal Info, it is made by meticulous Germans and works on all Android operating systems. Russification is and clings automatically. The free version has slightly reduced functionality and the presence of ads, but "home and family" is fine.

The program monitors the status of connections to the cellular network and via Wi-Fi, displays the main parameters of the hardware and operating system of the device, can warn (including by voice) about the loss and appearance of a cellular network signal, writes logs if necessary, shows on the map the location of the serving base station, etc. This is not a professional tool, but for the average user there is enough information and it is conveniently collected in one bottle.